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Online response in the 2013 Census: Respondent behaviours and characteristics

Online response in the 2013 Census: Respondent behaviours and characteristics presents the results of research carried out by Statistics NZ into two aspects of online response in the 2013 Census:

  • the behaviours of online respondents, in terms of when and how they completed their census forms
  • the overall demographics of online respondents, compared with those who completed paper forms.

The research was carried out to help us gain a better understanding of how people participated in the census, and how different sub-populations respond to an Internet-administered option for surveys. The results will inform planning decisions for the next census and other online collections.

In a broader sense, the findings described in this paper may offer useful insight into the characteristics of New Zealand Internet users in general. While limited in its scope, the 2013 Census of Population and Dwellings presents a unique opportunity to assess patterns of Internet use on a very large scale. The final section of the paper offers comparisons with the 2006 Census, and positions our results within the wider New Zealand and international contexts.

Please note: some numbers in this paper have been updated

Percentages in tables 4 and 5, and figures 11 and 12 were updated on 27 March 2014.

In the original publication, some 'not stated' responses were included in the calculation of percentages where the 'access to telecommunications' variable was used. This resulted in inconsistencies with data published in other 2013 Census data releases.

Tables 4 and 5 and figures 11 and 12 were updated to reflect the standard treatment of this variable, which excludes all 'not stated' responses (along with other residual categories). This has resulted in small changes to the reported percentages of households with Internet access, and individuals without Internet access, who completed their forms by each mode.

The overall trends and conclusions described in the paper remain unchanged.

Read this publication online, or download or print the PDF from 'Available files' above. If you have problems viewing the files, see opening files and PDFs.

ISBN 978-0-478-40878-2 (online)
Published 11 March 2014
Updated 27 March 2014

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