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Census gives insights into iwi

Image, 2013 census banner.

Tirohia tēnei whārangi i te reo Māori

More than 125,000 people say they belong to Ngāpuhi, making it the country’s biggest iwi, according to the latest census information released by Statistics New Zealand today. In contrast, 12 iwi have populations that are under 500.

The information comes from the 2013 Census iwi profiles, which also show the number of iwi members living in each region. Iwi populations are made up of people of Māori descent, those with whakapapa (Māori ancestry).

“The census forms provided a guide to help people identify their iwi, but Māori could also record other iwi they affiliate with. The results should give Māori and others a useful snapshot of iwi distribution across the country,” Census Manager Gareth Meech said.

Most people of Māori descent belong to only one iwi, although over 9,000 people said they affiliated with five different iwi.

Waitaha (Te Waipounamu / South Island) had the highest proportion of people (89.0 percent) who belonged to more than one iwi.

Most people who affiliated with an individual iwi lived in the North Island (85.8 percent), but over 70,000 people who affiliated with an individual iwi lived in the South Island at the time of the 2013 Census. Ngāi Tahu/Kāi Tahu is the largest iwi in the South Island, with 54.7 percent (29,766 people) of its people living there.

“Information in the profiles helps tell the story of the Māori descent population living in New Zealand. It helps iwi to see themselves more clearly and to support their decision making,” Mr Meech said.

The profiles include information about population, language, education, income, housing, and households. There are 99 individual iwi profiles and 13 natural iwi grouping profiles. Readers can find quick facts, simple tables and graphs, and links to iwi distribution maps.

The Māori descent population differs from the Māori ethnic population, which relates to cultural affiliation. In the census, people of Māori descent may list up to five iwi and rohe they belong to.

All 2013 Census individual iwi profiles and iwi grouping profiles are available on our website.
Iwi data can also be found in 2013 Census QuickStats about Māori as well as the NZ.Stat tables on culture and identity.

Ends

For media enquiries contact: Gareth Meech, Census Manager, Wellington 04 931 4600, info@stats.govt.nz

Authorised by Liz MacPherson, Government Statistician, 19 August 2014

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