Stats NZ has a new website.

For new releases go to

www.stats.govt.nz

As we transition to our new site, you'll still find some Stats NZ information here on this archive site.

  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+
2013 Census iwi grouping profiles:
Rangitāne
Unpaid activities

Ngā ngohe utukore

For people aged 15 years and over in the Rangitāne iwi grouping and living in New Zealand on 5 March 2013:

  • 34.7 percent of men and 46.6 percent of women had looked after a child who belonged to their household, while 19.0 percent of men and 32.9 percent of women had looked after a child who was not part of their household.
  • 12.3 percent had looked after a person who lived in their household and was ill or disabled, while 13.6 percent had helped a person in another household who was ill or disabled.
  • 26.1 percent carried out 'other helping or voluntary work for, or through any organisation, group or marae'. More women (28.2 percent) than men (23.6 percent) reported involvement in this type of voluntary work.

Unpaid activities for Rangitāne aged 15 years and over
By sex
2013 Census
Unpaid activities for specified iwi grouping, aged 15 years and over, by sex, 2013 Census.


Note: Unpaid activities information relates to the four weeks ending 5 March 2013.

Unpaid activities information includes all people who stated each unpaid activity, whether as their only unpaid activity or as one of several. Where a person reported more than one unpaid activity, they were counted in each applicable group. Therefore percentages do not add up to 100.

This data has been randomly rounded to protect confidentiality. Individual figures may not add up to totals, and values for the same data may vary in different text, tables, and graphs. The accuracy of percentages may be affected by this rounding, particularly for iwi groupings with small populations.

  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+
Top
  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+