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Definitions and information about the data

Definitions

Adult child: a ‘child in a family nucleus’ who is aged 15 years or over and employed full-time, or a ‘child in a family nucleus’ who is aged 18 years or over.

Child in a family nucleus: a person who usually resides with at least one parent, and with no partner or child(ren) of their own living in the same household. Can apply to a person of any age.

Dependent child under 18: a ‘child in a family nucleus’ aged under 15 years, or aged 15–17 years and not employed full-time.

Dependent young person: a dependent young person is a ‘child in a family nucleus’ aged 18–24 years and not employed full-time.

Employed: a person was employed if they were part of the working-age population (15 years and over) and if, during the week ended 3 March 2013, they:

  • worked for one hour or more for pay or profit in the context of an employee/employer relationship or self-employment, or
  • worked without pay for one hour or more in work that contributed directly to the operation of a farm, business, or professional practice owned or operated by a relative, or
  • had a job but were not at work due to:
    • their illness or injury
    • personal or family responsibilities
    • bad weather or mechanical breakdown
    • direct involvement in an industrial dispute
    • being on leave or holiday.

Full-time employment means usually working 30 or more hours per week.

Part-time employment means usually working fewer than 30 hours per week.

Extended family: a group of related people who usually reside together, as:

  • a family nucleus with one or more other related people, or
  • two or more related family nuclei, with or without other related people.

Included are people who were absent on census night but who usually live in a particular dwelling and are members of an extended family in that dwelling, as long as they were reported as being absent by the reference person on the dwelling form.

Family nucleus: a couple with or without child(ren), or one parent and their child(ren) whose usual residence is in the same household. Children can be any age, but do not have partners or children of their own living in that household.

Included are people who were absent on census night but who usually live in a particular dwelling, and are members of a family nucleus in that dwelling, as long as they were reported as being absent by the reference person on the dwelling form.

Family type: classifies families according to the presence or absence of couples, parents, and children.

Household: either one person who usually resides alone, or two or more people who usually reside together and share facilities (such as for eating, cooking, or a living area; and bathroom and toilet) in a private dwelling. Included are people who were absent on census night but usually live in a particular dwelling and are members of that household, as long as they were reported as being absent by the reference person on the dwelling form.

Household composition: classifies households according to the relationships between usually resident people. The classification is based on how many and what type(s) of family nuclei were present in a household, and whether or not there were related or unrelated people present.

Not in the labour force: refers to any person of working age (15 years and over) who was neither employed nor unemployed. Includes people for whom any of the following applied:

  • were retired
  • had personal or family responsibilities, such as unpaid housework and childcare
  • attended at least one educational institution
  • were permanently unable to work due to physical or mental disabilities
  • were temporarily unavailable for work in the week ended 3 March 2013
  • were not actively seeking work.

Sole parent: the parent in a one-parent family.

For census purposes, children in shared care usually reside at the place where they spend most nights. If they spend equal amounts of time at different residences, their usual residence is where they were on census night.

Some children classified as being in one-parent families may have two active parents in different households.

Study participation: measures those attending, studying, or enrolled at school or anywhere else. It is grouped into full-time study (20 hours or more a week), part-time study (less than 20 hours a week), and those not studying.

Unemployed: an unemployed person is in the working-age population (15 years and over) and, during the week ended 3 March 2013, was without a paid job but was available for work, and:

  • had actively sought work in the four weeks ended 3 March 2013, or
  • had a new job to start within the next four weeks.

If a person’s only job search method was to read job advertisements then they are not considered to be actively seeking work.

Information about the data

Comparability with past censuses

Because the 2011 Census was cancelled after the Canterbury earthquake on 22 February 2011, the gap between this census and the last one is seven years. The change in the data between 2006 and 2013 may be greater than in the usual five-year gap between censuses. Be careful when comparing trends.

In some sections of this report, we compare 2013 Census data with 2006 and 2001 Census data. In other sections, we compare it with 2006 or 2001 data only. The choice of which data to use for comparisons depended on the availability of data and the rate of change over time.

Calculation of percentages

Unless otherwise stated, all percentages and ratios in this report exclude responses that cannot be classified (eg 'not stated', 'household composition unidentifiable', and 'extended family not classifiable').

Confidentiality

The data in this report has been randomly rounded to protect confidentiality. Individual figures may not add up to totals, and values for the same data may vary in different tables.

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