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Definitions and information about the data

Definitions

Bedroom: a room that is used, or intended to be used, for sleeping in. This includes sleep outs. Caravans next to private dwellings are included if they are used as a bedroom by members of the same household that occupies the dwelling. A room (such as a living room) that is used for sleeping is not counted as a bedroom unless the only bedroom facilities in the dwelling are in that room.

Empty dwelling: a dwelling that did not have any current occupants and new occupants were not expected to move in on, or before, census night. Unoccupied holiday homes and dwellings being repaired or renovated are classified as empty dwellings.

Fuel types used to heat dwellings: types of fuels used to heat occupied private dwellings. More than one type of fuel may be used to heat a dwelling. This data does not indicate how often a particular type of fuel was used, only that it was used at least some of the time. For example, this data shows the percentage of dwellings in which electricity was used and the percentage of dwellings in which wood was used, but it does not indicate whether electricity was used more or less often than wood.

Home ownership by individuals: whether an individual owned or partly owned the dwelling they usually lived in. It relates to all people aged 15 years and over who lived in New Zealand, including those who lived in private dwellings and those who lived in non-private dwellings. This data has two categories:

  • owned or partly owned – this consists of people who owned their home, partly owned their home, or held it in a family trust (holding a dwelling in a family trust is considered to be a similar situation to owning, and distinct from other situations such as renting)
  • did not own – this includes people in a variety of situations: renting, living in a private dwelling owned by other household members such as parents, or living in a non-private dwelling such as a rest home, student hostel, or boarding house.

Some people may not own the dwelling they live in, but may own a dwelling elsewhere. This information is not collected in the census.

Home ownership by households: whether a household owned the dwelling they lived in, did not own it, or held it in a family trust, and whether mortgage or rent payments were made by the household. For a household to be counted as owning their home or holding it in a family trust, at least one household member had to own or partly own the home, or hold it in a family trust. Home ownership at the household level can be reported in two ways:

  • as the percentage of households who owned their home, excluding those who held it in a family trust
  • as the percentage of households who owned their home or held it in a family trust (having a dwelling in a family trust is regarded as a similar situation to owning, and distinct from renting or occupying a dwelling rent-free).

Some households may not own the dwelling they live in, but may own a dwelling elsewhere. This information is not collected in the census.

Households who rent: households that did not own their home, did not have it in a family trust, and were making rent payments.

Improvised dwelling or shelter: structures not intended for habitation and lacking the usual amenities such as lighting, bathroom, and cooking facilities. Examples include garages, sheds, and cars.

Joined private dwellings: private dwellings joined to other private dwellings. This includes flats, units, apartments, townhouses, or houses that are joined together horizontally, vertically, or both.

Non-private dwellings: dwellings that provide short- or long-term communal or transitory accommodation, and are available to the public, such as hotels, motels, boarding houses, hospitals, and residential care facilities.

Occupied dwellings: dwellings that were occupied at midnight on census night, or at any time during the 12 hours following midnight on census night, unless the occupant(s) completed their forms at another dwelling during that period. Occupied dwellings can be private or non-private. Most people live in private dwellings, but some live in non-private dwellings such as residential care for older people, student hostels, or boarding houses.

One-family households: includes couples, couples with children, and one-parent families, with or without other people.

Other multi-person households: groups of related or unrelated people living together, such as unrelated people 'flatting' together, or siblings living together.

Private dwellings: dwellings that accommodate a person or group of people and are not available to the public, such as houses, flats, and apartments.

Room: a space in a dwelling that is used, or intended to be used, for habitation and is enclosed by walls reaching from the floor to the ceiling. Service areas such as bathrooms, laundries, and walk-in wardrobes are excluded. For open-plan dwellings, room equivalents are counted as if there were walls between the different spaces.

Unoccupied dwellings: private dwellings that were empty or whose occupants were all away temporarily at the time of the census.

Information about the data

Comparability with past censuses

Because the 2011 Census was cancelled after the Canterbury earthquake on 22 February 2011, the gap between this census and the last one is seven years. The change in the data between 2006 and 2013 may be greater than in the usual five-year gap between censuses. Be careful when comparing trends.

In some sections of this report, 2013 Census data has been compared with 2006 and 2001 Census data. In other sections, it has been compared with 2006 or 2001 data only. The choice of which data to use for comparisons depended on the comparability of the earlier data with 2013 data, data quality, and the rate of change over time.

Comparisons for the number of storeys are with 2006 only. It is not possible to compare 2001 data on storeys with 2013 or 2006 data because the number of storeys was classified differently in 2001.

2013 Census information by variable has more on data quality and comparability over time.

Calculation of percentages

Unless otherwise stated, all percentages and ratios in this report exclude responses that cannot be classified (eg 'not stated', 'response unidentifiable', 'response out of scope'.)

Confidentiality

The data in this report has been randomly rounded to protect confidentiality. Individual figures may not add up to totals, and values for the same data may vary in different tables. 

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