Stats NZ has a new website.

For new releases go to

www.stats.govt.nz

As we transition to our new site, you'll still find some Stats NZ information here on this archive site.

  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+
Main means of travel to work

Information about main means of travel to work is based on the following question asked of employed adults, aged 15 years and over, in the census:

“On [census day], what was the one main way you travelled to work – that is, the one you used for the greatest distance?”

This means:
  • we don’t collect data about multiple modes of travel
  • data is a snapshot of one day (census day).

Means of travel to work for all employed people

Around 1 in 5 people did not travel to work on census day 2013

On census day in 2013, around 1 in 5 employed people either worked at home, or did not go to work.

The percentage of employed people who worked at home in 2013 was consistent with 2006:

  • 8.8 percent (169,677 people) in 2013
  • 8.7 percent (163,977 people) in 2006.

Over 200,000 employed adults did not go to work on census day in 2013 (207,141 people, or 10.8 percent).

Figure 1

Graph, Main means of travel to work, 2001, 2006, and 2013 Censuses.

Working at home highest in Hurunui district

Areas that are mostly rural had higher proportions of people working at home. In 2013, the territorial authorities with the highest proportions of employed people working at home were:

  • Hurunui district – 25.9 percent (1,554 people)
  • Otorohanga district – 25.3 percent (1,053 people)
  • Southland district – 24.9 percent (3,897 people).

Differences emerge in how men and women travel to work

On census day 2013, men were five times more likely than women to drive a company car, truck, or van to work. Men were over twice as likely to cycle to work as women. However, women were more likely than men to walk or jog to work.

Table 1
Main means of travel to work by sex(1)
2013 Census

Main means of travel to work

 Male

 Female 

 Total 

Male 

 Female 

Number 

 Percent 

Worked at home

 81,483

 88,194

 169,677

 48.0

 52.0

Did not go to work today

 78,942

 128,202

 207,141

 38.1

 61.9

Drove a private car, truck, or van

 469,509

 502,221

 971,733

 48.3

 51.7

Drove a company car, truck, or van

 183,270

 34,134

 217,404

 84.3

 15.7

Passenger in a car, truck, van, or company bus

 36,567

 39,870

 76,434

 47.8

 52.2

Public bus

 27,060

 37,320

 64,380

 42.0

 58.0

Train

 11,961

 12,675

 24,639

 48.5

 51.4

Motor cycle or power cycle

 22,212

 3,993

 26,208

 84.8

 15.2

Bicycle

 31,869

 12,315

 44,184

 72.1

 27.9

Walked or jogged

 49,449

 56,667

 106,119

 46.6

 53.4

Other(2)

 11,535

 6,798

 18,333

 62.9

 37.1

Total stated

 1,003,854

 922,395

 1,926,252

 52.1

 47.9

1. For employed people aged 15 years and over.
2. Includes boat, ferry, taxi, and aeroplane.
Source: Statistics New Zealand

Means of travel for people who travelled to work on census day

The following sections summarise the means of travel for employed people aged 15 years and over who travelled to work on census day. That is, excluding people who worked at home and people who did not go to work on census day.

Over 7 in 10 people who travel to work drive

On census day 2013, over 7 in 10 people who travelled to work drove a private or company car, truck, or van.

Of those who travelled to work, driving a private car, truck, or van was the most common mode by far (62.7 percent, or 971,733 people). This proportion is very similar to that in 2006 (62.9 percent, or 951,480 people).

Driving a company car, truck, or van was the second-most common mode, at 14.0 percent (217,404 people). The proportion was unchanged from 2006 (14.0 percent, or 212,211 people).

Figure 2

Graph, Main means of travel for people who travelled to work, 2001, 2006, and 2013 Censuses.

Public transport use increases slightly

Use of public transport has increased slightly since 2006. In 2013, 4.2 percent (64,380 people) used a public bus, compared with 3.9 percent (59,481 people) in 2006. Use of trains increased to 1.6 percent (24,639 people) from 1.3 percent (19,704 people) in 2006.

Walkers consistent, but more cyclists

Around 7 out of 100 people walked to work (106,119 people) in 2013. This has been consistent since the 2001 Census.

The percentage of people who cycled to work was 2.9 percent (44,184 people), up from 2.5 percent (38,091 people) in 2006.

Weather conditions on census day can influence changes in active modes of transport.

People in Hawke’s Bay and Northland regions most likely to drive a private vehicle to work

On census day 2013, the Hawke’s Bay and Northland regions had the highest percentages of people who drove a private car, truck, or van to work (both 66.8 percent). The Bay of Plenty (66.7 percent) and Auckland (65.4 percent) regions had the next-highest percentages.

The lowest percentage was in the Wellington region, where 48.4 percent of people drove a private car, truck, or van to work.

Kawerau district has highest proportion of people who drove a private car, truck, or van to work

Kawerau district, with one of the smallest populations of the territorial authorities, had the highest percentage of people who drove a private car, truck, or van to work (70.6 percent). Wellington city, at 39.2 percent, had the lowest proportion.

Figure 3

Graph, People that travelled to work who drove a private car, truck, or van, by territorial authority area, 2013 Census.

Wellington area has highest proportion of public transport users and walkers/joggers

In 2013, of those who travelled to work, Wellington city had the highest percentage who travelled by public bus. At 16.8 percent (14,565 people), this was more than double the percentages of the next-highest territorial authorities: Auckland with 6.5 percent (33,933 people), and Lower Hutt city with 6.2 percent (2,352 people).

Travelling to work by train was most common in the territorial authorities around Wellington city. The highest proportions of train travel occurred in:

  • Porirua city – 13.0 percent
  • Lower Hutt city – 12.1 percent
  • South Wairarapa and Kapiti Coast districts – both 11.9 percent.

Wellington city also had the highest proportion of people who walked or jogged to work, at 21.0 percent (18,186 people). Porirua city had the lowest, at 3.3 percent (603 people).

Small increase in public transport use in Auckland

Use of public transport has increased slightly in Auckland since 2006. In 2013, of people who travelled to work, 6.5 percent (33,933 people) used a public bus. This is compared with 5.8 percent (28,569 people) in 2006.

Of the Auckland local boards, Waitemata had the highest percentage of people that travelled by public bus, at 13.3 percent (4,593 people). Waitemata includes the Auckland central city.

In 2013, use of trains increased to 1.8 percent (9,459 people) – up from 1.1 percent (5,655 people) in 2006. The Papakura local board area had the highest percentage, at 4.3 percent (672 people), followed by the Waitakere Ranges local board area, with 4.0 percent (738 people).

Cycling to work highest in Nelson city

Nelson city had the highest percentage of people who travelled to work by bicycle, at 8.7 percent (1,524 people). This was up from 7.2 percent (1,215 people) in 2006. Christchurch city was next highest, at 7.0 percent (9,804 people) – up from 6.5 percent (9,093 people) in 2006.

Central Otago district has highest company vehicle use

In 2013, Central Otago was the territorial authority with the highest percentage of people driving a company car, truck, or van, at 22.1 percent (1,566 people). The Waimakariri district followed, with 20.7 percent (4,026 people). The lowest percentage was in Wellington city, at 6.6 percent (5,739 people).

Young people the most likely to use public transport or walk/jog

In 2013, of those employed people who travelled to work using the public bus or train, 15.5 percent were aged 20–24 years. This proportion steadily declined to 3.0 percent for those people aged 65 years and over.

Of people who walked or jogged to work, the most common age group was 20–24 years, at 15.8 percent.

Of people who cycled to work, the most common age group was 40–44 years, at 13.0 percent. 

Figure 4

Graph, Selected main means of travel to work by age group, 2013 Census.

  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+
Top
  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+