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Housing

Auckland City plans for growth in central business district (CBD) apartments

The Auckland City Council uses census data to plan for growth in the Auckland CBD. Census data, including age, income profiles, and employment information is combined with other sources to capture a wide picture of people who live in the CBD.

Between 1996 and the 2006 Census the number of apartment dwellers in the Auckland CBD more than quadrupled from 2,805 to 13,311. This accounted for more than 70 percent of growth in apartment dwellers nationwide.

Census information helps the council plan the services that CBD residents need such as infrastructure, transport, parks, and other community services. Having a clear profile of CBD residents allows the council to make informed decisions to achieve the best outcomes for the people and businesses located there.

2006 Census data was used to help bring additional broadband services to the Auckland CBD. The data was used to profile the area, focusing on topics such as occupation and household income. This led to new and better targeted investment from telecommunication companies, and resulted in additional fibre-rich services and greater broadband affordability for Auckland’s CBD residents and visitors.

Affordable housing for Waimate's older residents

Situated halfway between Timaru and Oamaru, Waimate has been growing in popularity over the years as a place to settle. However, consistent with the national trend, Waimate’s population is ageing. A growing concern among the community was the low incomes of older residents, and the affordability of local housing. For example, only 22.4 percent of those aged 65 years and over in Waimate received more than $20,000 a year. This compares with 32.2 percent for all of New Zealand.

The Waimate District Council knew that the increasing number of older residents on low incomes was putting pressure on low- to mid-range housing options. The council is now seeking funding from the government to build additional affordable accommodation as part of the Housing Innovation Fund.

Data from the 2006 Census was consistent with the council’s perceived changes in the local population and could be used to strengthen their case for additional government funding. Older residents are looking forward to more affordable housing in the future. The rest of the community will also benefit from less pressure on the rental market.

Improving bungalows in Buller

Buller’s hospitality is world renowned but they also know how to look after their own. Buller has a higher percentage of people aged 60 years and over on low incomes than the national average. The Buller District Council wants to improve the standard of the affordable accommodation it provides for these residents. Housing New Zealand’s Housing Innovation Fund supports local council housing needs that are not fully met by Housing New Zealand or the private market, such as housing for older people and people with disabilities.

The council used census information to identify the number of over 60-year-olds in the area with low incomes, and low income-to-rent ratios. At the time of the 2006 Census, only 11.5 percent of people aged over 60 years receive an income of $30,000 a year or more. The council also looked at population projections to estimate demand for housing in the future. By combining this information, the council had the evidence it needed to apply for additional funding.

Following the successful application in 2006/07, over 20 bungalows in Westport and Reefton are now being upgraded for older residents. The bungalows will have better access to bathrooms for people with disabilities, and improved safety and security features.

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