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Family definitions

Adult child

A 'child in a family nucleus' who is aged 15 years and over and employed full time, or a 'child in a family nucleus' who is aged 18 years and over.

Refer also to 'child in a family nucleus' and 'employed'.

Child in a family nucleus

To be a 'child in a family nucleus' a person must usually reside with at least one parent, and have no partner or child(ren) of their own living in the same household. Note that 'child(ren) in a family nucleus' can be a person of any age.

Child(ren) in a family nucleus is/are divided into two subgroups: 'dependent child(ren)' and 'adult child(ren)'.

Refer also to 'parent', 'adult child' and 'dependent child'.

Combined parental income for couples with child(ren)

Combined parental income for couples with child(ren) is derived by aggregating the total personal income for the couple.

Refer also to 'grouped total combined parental income for couples with child(ren)', 'total personal income' and 'sources of personal income'.

Consensual union

The relationship between two people usually resident in the same dwelling who:

  • share mutual concern for each other
  • have a degree of economic, social and emotional interdependence, and
  • consider their relationship to be akin to marriage or civil union.

Refer also to ‘civil union status’.

Couple

Two people who usually reside together and are legally married or in a civil union, or two people who are in a consensual union.

Refer also to ‘civil union status’ and ‘consensual union’.

Dependent child

A 'child in a family nucleus' who is under 18 years of age and who is not employed full time.

Refer also to 'child in a family nucleus' and 'employed'.

Extended family

An extended family is a group of related persons who usually reside together and consists of:

  • a family nucleus and one or more ‘other related persons’, or
  • two or more related family nuclei, with or without other related persons.

People who usually live in a particular dwelling, and are members of an extended family in that dwelling, but who are absent on census night, are included, as long as they are reported as being absent by the reference person on the dwelling form.

Refer also to 'absentee', 'usual resident' and 'usual residents in private dwellings'.

Familial relationship

A relationship in which a person is related to another person by blood, registered marriage, civil union, consensual union, fostering or adoption.

Family nucleus

A couple, with or without child(ren), or one parent and their child(ren) usually resident in the same dwelling. The children do not have partners or children of their own living in the same household.

People who usually live in a particular dwelling, and are members of a family nucleus in that dwelling, but who are absent on census night, are included, as long as they are reported as being absent by the reference person on the dwelling form.

Refer also to 'absentee', 'usual residents in private dwellings'.

Family type

The derived variable that classifies family nuclei according to the presence or absence of couples, parents and children.

Grouped total combined parental income for couples with child(ren)

The standard 15-category total combined parental income for couples with child(ren) classification cannot be used for outputting data about small geographic areas (meshblocks, area units or user-defined combinations of these) in the 2006 Census. Instead, grouped income categories must be used for these areas. The grouped total combined parental income for couples with child(ren) classification is:

  • $30,000 or less
  • $30,001–$50,000
  • $50,001–$70,000
  • $70,001–$100,000
  • $100,001 or more
  • not stated.

Refer also to 'combined parental income for couples with child(ren)', 'total personal income' and 'sources of personal income'.

Grouped total extended family income

The standard 15-category total extended family income classification cannot be used for outputting data about small geographic areas (meshblocks, area units or user-defined combinations of these) in the 2006 Census. Instead, grouped income categories must be used for these areas. The grouped total extended family income classification is:

  • $30,000 or less
  • $30,001–$50,000
  • $50,001–$70,000
  • $70,001–$100,000
  • $100,001 or more
  • not stated.

Refer also to 'total extended family income', 'total personal income' and 'sources of personal income'.

Grouped total family income

The standard 15-category total family income classification cannot be used for outputting data about small geographic areas (meshblocks, area units or user-defined combinations of these) in the 2006 Census. Instead, grouped income categories must be used for these areas. The grouped total family income classification is:

  • $20,000 or less
  • $20,001–$30,000
  • $30,001–$50,000
  • $50,001–$70,000
  • $70,001–$100,000
  • $100,001 or more
  • not stated.

Refer also to 'total family income', 'total personal income' and 'sources of personal income'.

Non-familial relationship

A relationship in which a person is not related to another person by blood, registered marriage, civil union, consensual union, fostering or adoption.

Number of children

Number of children is a derived variable that identifies the number of 'children in a family nucleus'.

Number of dependent children

Number of dependent children is a derived variable that identifies the number of 'dependent children'.

Parent

The mother, father (natural, step, adopted or foster), or 'person in a parent role' of a 'child in a family nucleus'.

Parent role

A 'person in a parent role' is a person who is not a mother or father (natural, step, adopted or foster) of the young person (as defined by the survey) but who nevertheless usually resides with that young person. This young person does not have a partner or child of their own and does not usually reside with their mother or father (natural, step, adopted or foster).

Partner

A person with whom another person is:

  • in a registered marriage
  • in a civil union, or
  • in a consensual union.

Refer also to ‘civil union status’ and ‘consensual union’.

Related

People who have a familial relationship.

Refer also to 'familial relationship'.

Same-sex partners

Two people of the same sex who are in a civil union or consensual union.

Sole parent

A sole parent is the parent in a one-parent family.

For the purposes of the census, children in joint custody usually reside at the place where they spend more nights, or if they spend equal amounts of time at each residence, they usually reside at the place where they are at the time of the census.

Some children classified as being in one-parent families have two active parents in different households.

Sources of extended family income

This variable identifies the various sources from which an extended family received their total extended family income in the 12 months ending 31 March 2006.

In the census, it is generally only realistic to collect money income. This is income that the individual respondent can normally recall or can readily retrieve from their financial records. Money income is money flow from the deployment of one's labour, entrepreneurial skills and assets, and transfers received. The concept of money income therefore relies on identifying the sources from which money income is derived.

Excluded are income in kind, imputed income, unrealised income and contingent income. Contingent income is that which depends on the unknown outcome of a course of action, for example to sue. Moneys received by borrowing, making withdrawals from savings and receiving repayments of loan principal are excluded. Tax credits and reimbursements of expenses are also excluded.

Sources of family income

This variable identifies the various sources that a family received their total family income from in the 12 months ending 31 March 2006.

In the census, it is generally only realistic to collect money income. This is income that the individual respondent can normally recall or can readily retrieve from their financial records. Money income is money flow from the deployment of one's labour, entrepreneurial skills and assets, and transfers received. The concept of money income therefore relies on identifying the sources from which money income is derived.

Excluded are income in kind, imputed income, unrealised income and contingent income. Contingent income is that dependent on the unknown outcome of a course of action, for example to sue. Moneys received by borrowing, making withdrawals from savings and receiving repayments of loan principal are excluded. Tax credits and reimbursements of expenses are also excluded.

Total extended family income

Total extended family income is derived by aggregating the total personal income of all members of the extended family.

Refer also to 'grouped total extended family income', 'total personal income' and 'sources of personal income'.

Total family income

Total family income is derived by aggregating the total personal income of all members of the family nucleus.

Refer also to 'grouped total family income', 'total personal income' and 'sources of personal income'.

Type of couple

Type of couple is a derived variable that indicates whether a couple or individual is in an opposite-sex or same-sex (male or female) couple.

Unrelated

People who have a non-familial relationship.

Refer also to ‘non-familial relationship'.

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