Stats NZ has a new website.

For new releases go to

www.stats.govt.nz

As we transition to our new site, you'll still find some Stats NZ information here on this archive site.

  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+
Our outcome

This chapter evaluates our performance during 2012/13 against the overall outcome we are seeking, which is for official statistics to be increasingly used to inform decisions, and to monitor and understand the state and progress of New Zealand:

Figure 4 shows how our outcome of ‘An informed society using official statistics’ contributes to the Government’s goal to grow the New Zealand economy.

Figure 4

 Figure 4

Official statistics are the cornerstone of good government. They are the statistics produced by government from surveys, administrative data, and registration records that are, or can be, published. Official statistics report on, and project, New Zealand’s economic, demographic, social, and environmental situation. They tell the story of New Zealand’s development, and at the same time help to shape it.

Official Statistics System’s outcome: An informed society using official statistics

We will know we have achieved the outcome of an informed society using official statistics when more people use official statistics for decision-making, monitoring, and understanding the state and progress of New Zealand. By people, we mean the key client groups of ministers, central and local government, businesses, media, Māori, and the public.

A number of measures in the following two tables are based on the results of three surveys we have held to date on the use and trust in official statistics. We focused on the public as a key user group in the first survey held in 2010. In 2011, the second survey focused on government users. In 2012, the survey was carried out for businesses.

These surveys will be carried out on a cyclical basis every three years. The goal is to accumulate results covering all key user groups, and to demonstrate improved results for each group over time.

The progress we made towards the success of this outcome is summarised in table 1.

Table 1

Measuring success towards an informed society using official statistics

Measure Baseline Progress in 2012/13
Increase in the number of users of official statistics.

64 percent of public respondents used statistics in some way.

Improve result when the Use and Trust in Official Statistics Survey of the public runs again in 2013/14.

;27 percent actively used New Zealand government statistics in the previous 12 months. Improve result when the Use and Trust in Official Statistics Survey of the public runs again in 2013/14.
59 percent of Māori respondents used statistics in some way. Maintain results for Māori at similar levels as the total sample when Use and Trust in Official Statistics Survey of the public runs again in 2013/14.
26 percent of Māori respondents actively used statistics.2
44 percent of government worker respondents had used statistics in the previous 12 months.3 Improve result when the Use and Trust in Official Statistics Survey of government workers runs again in 2014/15.
60 percent of business respondents had accessed official statistics in the previous 12 months.4 Improve result when the Use and Trust in Official Statistics Survey of government workers runs again in 2014/15.
Target: Improve results when the Use and Trust in Official Statistics Survey is run again in three years.
Maintain results for Māori at similar levels to the total sample.
Increase the use of official statistics in central government decisions.

Since 2010/11 official statistics were used by the following groups to report to government:

  • Capital Market Development Taskforce
  • 2025 Taskforce
  • Welfare Working Group
  • Economic Growth Agenda
  • Housing Shareholders Advisory Group
  • Savings Working Group
  • Tax Working Group.

Target: Identify and implement a method for monitoring the use of official statistics in central government decisions (in conjunction with Cabinet Office).

We continued to be represented in the user group developing the new system for submitting and accessing Cabinet papers. The project will improve the accessibility of the cabinet paper submission and consultation process.

Projects are underway to enhance the understanding and use of official statistics in policy development work by government departments and agencies, and to develop performance measures to monitor the OSS using the framework already established.

Our statistics were used for the following initiatives:

  • joint agency project on foreign direct investment
  • Natural Resource Sector group
  • Building and Construction Productivity Partnership
  • minimum wage review
  • Better Public Services Programme Result indicators.
Ensure the right statistical information is produced by the OSS to better support decision- making and understanding.

The list of New Zealand’s most important (Tier 1) statistics was reviewed in 2011.

The Government Statistician, supported the OSS Chief Executives Steering Group, provided purchase advice to ministers about statistical investment and statistical priorities for departments, (including Statistics New Zealand).

Target: Obtain agreement on the implementation of the revised Tier 1 list, including the costings and development timeline.

Provide annual purchase advice, to the satisfaction of the Minister

The Tier 1 list was agreed by Cabinet in June 2012. Over 2012/13 there has been ongoing monitoring of the implementation of the list.

We submitted purchase advice for Budget 2013 in January 2013. It focused on identifying low priority statistical spending funding that could be reallocated for the development of unfunded Tier 1 statistics.

Tier 1 statistics-producing agencies were involved in the purchase advice process. $900,000 was reallocated from Vote Statistics to Vote Housing for the development of housing affordability statistics starting in 2013/14.

Ensure the OSS functions efficiently and effectively. In 2011/12 we advised producers of official statistics as they requested, and published some statistics on our website on behalf of other agencies (Ministry of Justice, New Zealand Police).

We are a member of the Open Data and Information Reuse working group, which advises Government on data accessibility and integration, and the dissemination and use of administrative data.

Target: Increase advice to OSS partners to increase statistical capability, and progress exploration of potential shared infrastructure.

Continue to contribute to making Government data more accessible, and identify options for further data integration and reuse.
In June 2013, we considered options for extending statistical services across the OSS and agreed to further develop services for data dissemination (NZ.Stat) and data integration (the Integrated Data Infrastructure) so that these services can be used by other government agencies, supporting good practice and efficiencies across government.

Over the next year we will work with OSS partners to identify what other statistical services could be shared across the OSS in the future.

Statistics New Zealand continues to support the Open Government Data and Information Re-use programme. In 2012/13, we issued best practice guidance to agencies considering release of high-value public data, presented case studies on the re-use of official statistics, and held seminars on release practices, confidentiality, and documentation of data.

2. From the 2010 Use and Trust in Official Statistics Survey of public respondents.
3. From the 2010 Use and Trust in Official Statistics Survey of government workers.
4. From the 2010 Use and Trust in Official Statistics Survey of business respondents. Note these figures are weighted but come from a relatively small sample of respondents.

top

Statistics New Zealand’s impact: New Zealand gets the statistical information it needs to grow and prosper

The progress we made towards having the desired impact that New Zealand gets the statistical information it needs to grow and prosper is summarised in table 2.

Table 2

Measuring success towards an informed society using official statistics

Measure Baseline Progress in 2012/13
Increase in the number of users who report that government has the information they need.

96 percent of public respondents said government had the statistics they needed.

 

48 percent of public respondents reported government ‘almost always’ had the information they needed.

Increase the proportion of ‘almost always’ responses when the Use and Trust in Official Statistics Survey of the public runs again in 2013/14.

48 percent of public respondents said government ‘sometimes’ had the information they needed.5
41 percent of government workers said government departments ‘almost always’ had the information needed. Increase the proportion of ‘almost always’ responses when the Use and Trust in Official Statistics Survey of government workers runs again in 2014/15.
50 percent of government workers said government departments ‘sometimes' had the information needed.6  
33 percent of business respondents said government departments ‘almost always’ had the information needed. Increase the proportion of ‘almost always’ responses when the Use and Trust in Official Statistics Survey of businesses runs again in 2015/16.
56 percent of business respondents said government departments ‘sometimes’ had the information needed.7  
Target: Maintain results at similar levels when the Use and Trust in Official Statistics Survey of the public runs again in 2013/14.
Increase in number of users who trust official statistics
Producers of Tier 1 statistics comply with the OSS’s Principles and Protocols.
86 percent of public respondents trusted statistics produced by government (this level was higher than for all European countries and similar to Australia’s).

Maintain or improve this result when the Use and Trust in Official Statistics Survey of the public runs again in 2013/14.

Maintain this high level of trust in relation to Europe and Australia.

77 percent of Māori respondents (compared with 87 percent of non-Māori) trusted statistics produced by government.8 Decrease the gap between Māori and total proportion of respondents when the Use and Trust in Official Statistics Survey of the public runs again in 2013/14.
78 percent of government worker respondents trusted statistics produced by government.9 Maintain or improve this rate in future surveys when the Use and Trust in Official Statistics Survey of government workers runs again in 2014/15.
57 percent of business respondents said they ‘almost always’ trust government statistics. Increase the proportion of ‘almost always’ responses when the Use and Trust in Official Statistics Survey of businesses runs again in 2015/16.
31 percent of business respondents said they ‘sometimes’ trust government statistics.10  
Target: Maintain or improve this rate in future surveys.

Maintain this high level of trust in relation to Europe and Australia.

Decrease the gap between Māori and total proportion of respondents.

Producers of Tier 1 statistics comply with the OSS's Principles and Protocols

Agencies that had not complied with aspects of the three protocols (as surveyed in the years up to and including 2009/10) had improved their practices.

Producers of Tier 1 statistics evaluated themselves on a fourth protocol, Frameworks Standards and Classifications. They all complied, but at different levels, ranging from excellent to acceptable.

Target: Producers of Tier 1 statistics comply with the Principles and Protocols.

We assessed agencies on protocol 6, Management, Documentation, and Preservation of Statistical Records. We prepared a summary of findings, on this and protocol 3, Respondent Management Assessment, for Advisory Committee on Official Statistics (ACOS) in late 2012.

Where protocol 3 was concerned, all agencies who conduct surveys were assessed. All but one were found to have a policy on respondent management and most had some measure of respondent load. All agencies evaluate impact on respondents when making changes to their survey collections. Many agencies are looking for new ways to collect data while reducing respondent burden. Further work is necessary in 2013/14 to fully evaluate Element 8 participation by Māori.

Where protocol 6 was concerned, the assessment found that, while the agencies interviewed have processes and procedures in place for managing much of their statistical data and documentation, few agencies have documented these and have policies in place. All agencies interviewed were looking for ways to improve the management and documentation of their data. All agencies were keen for us to provide further guidance on data management, documentation and preservation, including examples of quality policies, procedures, and templates.

We also sent full reports on the assessment of protocols 3 and 6 to chief executives of agencies that produce Tier 1 statistics.

Increase in number of people aware of official statistics.

61 percent of public respondents were aware of our statistics, and at least one-third had heard of statistics produced by other government departments.

Improve proportion of respondents who are aware of our statistics when the Use and Trust in Official Statistics Survey of the public runs again in 2013/14.

49 percent of Māori respondents (compared with 63 percent of non-Māori) said they were aware of our statistics.11 Decrease the gap between Māori and total proportion of respondents when the Use and Trust in Official Statistics Survey of the public runs again in 2013/14.
In 2011, 70 percent of government worker respondents were aware of our statistics, while 23–48 percent were aware of statistics produced by other government departments.12 Maintain or improve this rate when the Use and Trust in Official Statistics Survey of government workers runs again in 2014/15
89 percent of business respondents were aware of statistics produced by Statistics New Zealand.13

Maintain or improve this rate when the Use and Trust in Official Statistics Survey of businesses runs again in 2015/16.

Target: Improve proportion of respondents who are aware of our statistics. Decrease the gap between Māori and total proportion of respondents.
Increase in user satisfaction with accessibility of statistics.

87 percent of public respondents reported they found it ‘very easy’, or ‘fairly easy’, to find the statistics they wanted from government.

Maintain or improve this result when the Use and Trust in Official Statistics Survey of the public runs again in 2013/14.

86 percent of Māori reported they found it ‘very easy’, or ‘fairly easy’, to find the statistics they wanted from government.14  Maintain this level when the Use and Trust in Official Statistics Survey of the public runs again in 2013/14.
50 percent of government worker respondents reported they found it ‘very easy’ or ‘fairly easy’ to find the statistics they wanted from government.11 Maintain or improve this rate when the Use and Trust in Official Statistics Survey of government workers runs again in 2014/15. 
79 percent of businesses reported they found it ‘very easy’ or ‘fairly easy’ to find the New Zealand statistics they wanted.12  Maintain or improve this rate when the Use and Trust in Official Statistics Survey of businesses runs again in 2015/16.
Target: Maintain this level in future surveys.

5. From the Use and Trust in Official Statistics Survey of public respondents.
6. From the 2011 Use and Trust in Official Statistics Survey of government workers.
7. From the 2012 Use and Trust in Official Statistics Survey of business respondents. Note these figures are weighted but come from a relatively small sample of respondents.
8. From the 2010 Use and Trust in Official Statistics Survey of public respondents.
9. From the 2011 Use and Trust in Official Statistics Survey of government workers.

10. From the 2012 Use and Trust in Official Statistics Survey of business respondents. Note these figures are weighted but come from a relatively small sample of respondents.
11. From the 2010 Use and Trust in Official Statistics Survey of public respondents.
12. From the 2011 Use and Trust in Official Statistics Survey of government workers.

13. From the 2012 Use and Trust in Official Statistics Survey of business respondents. Note these figures are weighted but come from a relatively small sample of respondents.
14. From the 2010 Use and Trust in Official Statistics Survey of public respondents.

top

Ministerial and Government priorities

The Minister of Statistics identified the top priorities for us for 2012–14.

These priorities contribute to the Government's top four priorities:
    1.    Responsibly manage Government finances.
    2.    Build a more competitive and productive economy.
    3.    Deliver better public services to New Zealanders.Rebuild Christchurch, New Zealand’s second-biggest city.

Table 3 shows the link between the Minister’s priorities and our strategic priorities, and the progress we’ve made so far against all the priorities during 2012/13.

Table 3

Measuring success towards achieving ministerial priorities and our strategic priorities

Ministerial priority Statistics New Zealand strategic priority Progress in 2012/13
Maximise the benefits from Government’s investment in official statistics.

Lead the OSS so that it efficiently meets the country’s needs for relevant, trustworthy, and accessible information.

The Government Statistician provided purchase advice on statistical investment as part of Budget 2013.

Successfully implement the Stats 2020 transformation programme.

Create a responsive, customer-focused, influential, and sustainable organisation.

 

We achieved all critical central agency milestones on programme monitoring and reporting.

We introduced a new role, Deputy Government Statistician Transformation, and a Transformation Programme Board to deliver the outcomes and benefits of the transformation programme.

Finalise an agreed list of New Zealand’s most important statistics (known as Tier 1 statistics). Lead the OSS so that it efficiently meets the country’s needs for relevant, trustworthy, and accessible information. The Tier 1 list was agreed by Cabinet in June 2012. During 2012/13 we monitored the implementation of 2012 Tier 1 list and reported quarterly progress to the Minister.
Build stakeholder confidence in key statistics. Obtain more value from official statistics. We published 279 statistical releases and reports, and issued only one correction of ‘high’ significance, and two of ‘medium’ significance.

We collaborated with Treasury and the Reserve Bank to maintain and update New Zealand’s System of National Accounts. We introduced new international standards for gross domestic product and balance of payments statistics, and coordinated an independent review of the consumers price index.

We extended the Household Production Platform to host data from the Household Labour Force Survey (HLFS).
Improve access to government-held information and data. Obtain more value from official statistics. We continued to have a leading role to the Open Government Data and Information Re-use programme to release high-value public data.

We successfully progressed an amendment to the Statistics Act 1975 in August 2012 that allows wider access to microdata for bona fide research or statistical purposes in the public interest. The amendment allows, at the Government Statistician's discretion, access for researchers from non-government departments.

Following the amendment to the Act, we launched a remote access to microdata service for researchers in June 2013.

We published New Zealand in Profile: 2013 in English and te reo Māori – Te Ahua o Aotearoa: 2013 – in June 2012. We continued to use infographics to display data in a more interesting, simple, and user-friendly way

We launched NZ.Stat, our web tool that allows users to create their own tables from large datasets. NZ.Stat uses a platform managed by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and is supplemented by an international user community.
Planning and delivery of the 2013 Census and future census transformation. Transform the way we deliver our statistics. We successfully delivered the 2013 Census collection phase, including the Canterbury census strategy.

The online census system processed 120,000 forms per hour at its peak. Online uptake will be close to the 35 percent target. The final total uptake will be confirmed in December 2013.

During the year, we planned two post-census surveys, Te Kupenga (formerly known as the Māori Social Survey) and the Disability Survey. Te Kupenga went into the field in June 2013, and the Disability Survey went into the field in July 2013.

As part of the Transforming Census Strategy, we trialled a mail-out process in a South Island town during the 2013 Census with a view to reducing costs of delivering and collecting forms. Investigations continue into alternative ways of producing small area population and socio-demographic statistics in the long term including considering the frequency of the census and exploring the feasibility of a census based on administrative data.
Reinstate Statistics New Zealand’s Christchurch operations. Create a responsive, customer-focused, influential, sustainable organisation. Our main office in central Christchurch (Dollan House) was officially reopened by the Minister of Statistics, Hon Maurice Williamson, on 19 July 2012.

  

  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+
Top
  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+