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Inter-industry study 1996

What it's about

The main objective of an inter-industry (or input-output) study is to provide an economic statement of the industrial structure of the economy for a given year, by measuring the direct and indirect relationships between industries and commodities. Input-output analysis is an integral part of compiling the New Zealand System of National Accounts.

This approach began with the 1986-87 Inter-Industry Study, with annual input-output analyses undertaken since 1990-91. The benefits of compiling the national accounts within an input-output framework include a greater degree of data confrontation, by analysing flows of products through the economy in a systematic way at the same time as analysing the incomes generated by production. This improves the accuracy of the national accounts as a system.

The input-output framework involves simultaneous compilation using the three approaches to measuring GDP:

  • as the sum of incomes generated through the production process
  • as the sum of final demand for products produced
  • as the sum of value added at each stage of production, ie the difference between the value of gross output and intermediate consumption of producers

In national accounting and economic analysis two basic kinds of input-output tables (or matrices) are referred to:

  • Supply and use tables: the supply and use tables (as named in this study) are sometimes referred to as 'rectangular input-output' tables, 'make and use' tables, or the 'supply and disposition of commodities'. The term 'rectangular' is used because there are more commodities (rows) than industries (columns).
  • Symmetric input-output tables: the symmetric input-output tables are also termed 'analytical' or 'derived' tables, 'square' tables, or 'Leontief-type input-output' tables (matrices).

The symmetrical tables are either product-by-product or industry-by-industry tables. Product-by-product tables are theoretically more appropriate than industry-by-industry tables for some analytical purposes. Differences between these types of tables arise only because industries may engage in different kinds of productive activities simultaneously. If it is possible to transfer some 'non-characteristic' or 'secondary' activity attributed to an industry to another then the results obtained by industry-by-industry tables are similar to those obtained by product-by-product tables. Industry-by-industry tables are compiled in the Inter-Industry Study 1996 because:

  1. detailed information on inputs are not normally available for products;
  2. most of the analytical applications of input-output tables can be satisfied using industry-by-industry tables.

Tables available in the Inter-Industry Study 1996

The Inter-Industry Study 1996 has been compiled at a similar level of industry and product detail as the 1986-87 study, and is more detailed than the smaller studies conducted since 1990-91. The 1996 input-output tables are available at two levels of detail:

In addition to the two basic kinds of input-output tables noted above (ie supply and use, and symmetric industry-by-industry tables) this study has compiled a number of specially derived tables. These tables are developed from the basic tables, generally have relationships expressed using coefficients, and provide users with further tools to measure the sensitivities of economic changes.

Published 22 August 2001

 

49 Industries

Contents

Introduction

Money flow and product flow tables

Using inter-industry tables

Table 1: Supply of products in basic prices
Table 2: Use of products in basic prices
Table 3: Imports into industries and categories of final demand in basic prices
Table 4: Inter-industry transactions in basic prices
Table 5: Industry by industry total requirements (direct & indirect) per unit of final demand
Table 6: Ultimate disposition of the output of industries
Table 7: Cumulated primary input coefficients of industries
Table 8: Cumulated primary input coefficients of categories of final demand
Table 9: Cumulated import coefficients of industries and categories of final demand

Inter-industry tables 1996

Table 1: Supply of products in basic prices.
Table 2: Use of products in basic prices.
Table 3: Imports into industries and categories of final demand in basic prices.
Table 4: Inter-Industry transactions in basic prices.
Table 5: Industry by industry total requirements (direct & indirect) per unit of final demand.
Table 6: Ultimate disposition of the output of industries.
Table 7: Cumulated primary input coefficients of industries.
Table 8: Cumulated primary input coefficients of categories of final demand.
Table 9: Cumulated import coefficients of industries and categories of final demand

Commodity and industry concordances

Commodity mapping in the Inter-industry Study 1996
Industry mapping in the Inter-industry Study 1996

 

126 Industries

Contents

Introduction

Money flow and product flow tables

Using inter-industry tables

Table 1: Supply of products in basic prices
Table 2: Use of products in basic prices
Table 3: Imports into industries and categories of final demand in basic prices
Table 4: Inter-industry transactions in basic prices
Table 5: Industry by industry total requirements (direct & indirect) per unit of final demand
Table 6: Ultimate disposition of the output of industries
Table 7: Cumulated primary input coefficients of industries
Table 8: Cumulated primary input coefficients of categories of final demand
Table 9: Cumulated import coefficients of industries and categories of final demand

Inter-industry tables 1996

Table 1: Supply of products in basic prices.
Table 2: Use of products in basic prices.
Table 3: Imports into industries and categories of final demand in basic prices.
Table 4: Inter-Industry transactions in basic prices.
Table 5: Industry by industry total requirements (direct & indirect) per unit of final demand.
Table 6: Ultimate disposition of the output of industries.
Table 7: Cumulated primary input coefficients of industries.
Table 8: Cumulated primary input coefficients of categories of final demand.
Table 9: Cumulated import coefficients of industries and categories of final demand

Commodity and industry concordances

Commodity mapping in the Inter-industry Study 1996
Industry mapping in the Inter-industry Study 1996

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