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Investment in research and development grows
Embargoed until 10:45am  –  22 March 2011

Research and Development Survey: 2010  –  Media Release

Total research and development (R&D) spending increased to almost $2.5 billion in 2010, Statistics New Zealand said today. This is an increase of 13 percent from 2008. The business sector continues to spend the most on research and development, over $1 billion of R&D in 2010. 

Research and development expenditure as a percentage of gross domestic product (GDP) also increased between 2008 and 2010. Total research and development as a percentage of gross domestic product was 1.30 percent, compared with 1.19 percent in 2008.

Universities increased the amount they spent on research and development in 2010 $802 million, up from $653 million in 2008. This is due to increased focus on research and development by universities and higher funding from both business and government.

 “Across all sectors there was a trend toward more commercially focused R&D” Statistics New Zealand’s manager of research and development statistics Hamish Hill said. In 2010, over 70 percent of the research and development was applied research or experimental development. These types of research and development are more likely to have commercial applications.

The Research and Development Survey 2010 was developed jointly with the Ministry of Science and Innovation (MSI) and is conducted by Statistics New Zealand. A full report on the results of the 2010 survey will be published on 27 May 2011.

 

Geoff Bascand

22 March 2011

Government Statistician

 

 
END

For media enquiries contact:
Hamish Hill
Wellington 04 931 4600
Email: info@stats.govt.nz  

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