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Males' Income 20 Percent Higher than Females' Five Years After Leaving Study
Embargoed until 10:45am  –  03 April 2007

Student Loans and Allowances: 2005  –  Media Release

Males' income was consistently higher than females' income five years after leaving study, across every field of study, Statistics New Zealand said today. The average income one year after leaving study for males who left study in 2000 was 6 percent higher than the average income for females who left in the same year. Males' average income five years after leaving study was 20 percent higher than females' for the same cohort of students who left study in 2000. Statistics in this release apply to those who had borrowed and/or received an allowance during study.

Students who last studied health courses in 2000 had the highest average income of all fields of study one year and five years post-study. The average income for those students was $31,300 in 2001 and $39,530 in 2005, an increase of 26 percent. Students who last studied food, hospitality and personal service courses in 2000 had the lowest income of all fields of study one year and five years post-study, earning, on average, $16,420 in 2001 and $23,650 in 2005.

The average leaving debt accumulated by students who borrowed under the Student Loan Scheme increased from $11,220 for those who left study in 1997 to reach $14,780 for those who left study in 2004 (an increase of 32 percent).

The average leaving debt for those aged 60 and over increased significantly from $6,790 in 1997 to $16,340 in 2004 (an increase of 141 percent). The biggest numeric and percentage increase in borrowing in any given year between 2000 and 2005 was also in the 60 and over age group, with average borrowing of $6,010 in 2000 and $8,040 in 2005 (an increase of 34 percent). Their average income one year after leaving study remained the lowest of all the age groups at $16,600.

The proportion of debt repaid within five years of leaving study has decreased over time. Borrowers who left study in 1995 had paid off, on average, 32 percent of their loan five years later. Students who left in 2000 had paid off, on average, 21 percent of their loan five years after leaving study.

While Pacific peoples and European ethnic groups who left study in 2000 had similar average debt on leaving study ($13,640 for European and $13,420 for Pacific peoples), a large repayment discrepancy had appeared within five years. European borrowers paid off, on average, 25 percent of their loan five years after leaving study (the highest percentage for all ethnicities), while Pacific peoples had paid off only 4 percent of their loan (the lowest percentage for all ethnicities).

The number of students receiving only an allowance nearly halved between 2000 and 2005, decreasing 44 percent from 12,873 in 2000 to 7,251 in 2005. The number of students receiving a loan and an allowance also decreased 13 percent between 2000 and 2005, down from 52,275 in 2000 to 45,420 in 2005. While the number of students receiving allowances had decreased, students who had both a loan and an allowance borrowed less, on average, than students who had a loan only (17 percent less in 2000 and 13 percent less in 2005).

These results come from the Integrated Dataset on Student Loans and Allowances, which was released today. In addition to statistics on borrowing and debt, statistics have been produced for the first time on allowances, full repayment and income trends.

Dallas Welch (Mrs)

3 April 2007
Acting Government Statistician Cat 01.500 Set 06/07 – 151 

END

For media enquiries contact:
Guido Stark – Statistics New Zealand
Tel no: (04) 931 4600
Email: info@stats.govt.nz

For further information contact:

Roger Smyth – Ministry of Education
Manager, Tertiary Sector Performance and Reporting
Tel no: (04) 463 8633
Mob no: (021) 120 7757

Geordie Cassin – StudyLink
Communications Manager, StudyLink
Tel no: (04) 978 4115

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