Stats NZ has a new website.

For new releases go to

www.stats.govt.nz

As we transition to our new site, you'll still find some Stats NZ information here on this archive site.

  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+
Appendix 4: Workshop process

After the gap analysis process, we held nine topic workshops and a hui for the Māori environmental statistics topic. The aim of the workshops was to seek initiatives to address the issues identified by the gap analysis. These workshops were co-facilitated by a Statistics NZ staff member and a skilled independent facilitator.

The first step was to make clear to everyone the purpose and processes involved in the environment domain plan. This included highlighting the wide consultations held to create the enduring questions, the stocktake, and the gap analysis.

After this, the topics’ enduring questions and the gap analysis results were presented (see appendix 3, Gap analysis process).

The independent facilitator then sought everyone’s initial reactions to the gap analysis results. These reactions were written on a whiteboard, which began the process of identifying the issues from the gap analysis. It also helped explain the various ‘positions’ held by the workshop participants.

The next part of the workshop was a facilitated discussion, in which the issues were further teased out and logged on the whiteboard.

To begin the process of finding the initiatives needed to address the identified issues, individuals were instructed to write ideas onto ‘stickies’. These were then shared in small groups and then reported back to the main session, with the stickies placed in clusters of related themes on the wall.

Sentences summarising the various clusters were then crafted by the group (using the facilitators to wrangle the ideas) onto a whiteboard. These sentences became the initiatives.

Prioritising these initiatives was achieved by giving each organisation five votes (coloured sticky dots) that could be placed on the board against any initiatives they thought should be a priority.

The resulting high-priority initiatives were highlighted, followed by a presentation on the future steps for the domain plan.

Workshop participants were informed of the next steps for the domain plan and their potential involvement in the initiatives.

  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+
Top
  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+