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Forests and Forest Products

The following information on Forest and Forest Products was recovered from our archives. The page was last modified on 7 November 2005, but as it is not only of archival value but contains information that is till relevant today, it is reproduced here in full.

New Zealand forests

New Zealand’s forest resource covers over 8 million hectares, or 29 percent of New Zealand’s total land area. Indigenous forests make up the majority of this with 6.3 million hectares, planted production forest accounts for the remaining 1.7 million hectares. The forestry account provides annual estimates of this resource.

There is no globally accepted definition of a forest. For the purposes of the accounts, forests are defined as having tree crown cover (or equivalent stocking level) of more than 10 percent, an area of more than 0.5 hectares and an actual (or potential) minimum height of 5 metres at maturity in situ. The account does not include scrub, mangrove, orchards or linear tree features, such as trees bordering roads and rivers. It does however include shelterbelts of trees with an area of more than 0.5 hectares and a width of more than 20 metres. The forestry account is at present available at a national level only.

Indigenous forests occur in most parts of New Zealand, but are particularly dominant on the mountain slopes of the West Coast and Fiordland areas of the South Island. Approximately 77 percent of New Zealand’s indigenous forests are Crown-owned, the vast majority of which are set aside for conservation, heritage and recreation uses. About three percent of this has been set aside for future sustainable harvesting. The remaining 23 percent of indigenous forests are privately owned, of which only ten percent is currently considered available for sustainably managed timber production. New Zealand law requires that they be managed in such a way that they can provide products and amenity value for future generations. The major indigenous species include beech, kauri, rimu, taraire and tawa.

Exotic forests have been planted in New Zealand since the early 20th century and are found throughout the country. Approximately one third are located in the central North Island, with other major forest growing areas including Northland, East Coast, Hawkes Bay, Nelson, Marlborough, Otago and Southland. The dominant species is radiata pine, which makes up ninety percent of the total exotic forests. Douglas fir makes up five percent, eucalyptus two percent and the remainder is a variety of special purpose species such as black walnut and Corsican pine.

Forestry accounts

The forestry stock account shows the composition of New Zealand’s forest resource, how the resource changes annually, and the reason for the changes. Harvesting is identified in the stock account as it is a major component of change in commercial forests. The stock account will present the forest resource in terms of total hectares, total cubic metres and total dollar valuation.

The forestry flow account will show how the annual harvested timber from the stock account is processed through the economy, by which industries, and the value of these products. The flow accounts will also try to show what and how much waste residues are being produced by the wood processing industry, and how these are being utilised. The physical flow accounts will present the supply and use of forest commodities in standard volume units.

Physical stock account

The physical stock account provides information on the physical stock of forestry resources in New Zealand for the period 1995 to 2000. It provides estimates of the annual size of the forestry estate in New Zealand both in hectares and cubic metres. The account shows the changing level of forestry resources in New Zealand over time and provides an insight into the reasons and types of change.

The following file is available to download in Adobe Acrobat format. If you do not have the Adobe Acrobat Reader you may download the reader to view or print the contents of this file.

Monetary stock account

The forestry monetary stock account provides information on the monetary stock of commercial forestry resources in New Zealand for the period 1995 to 2000. The account shows the changes in monetary stock levels over time, and the value of annual growth and harvesting. The account does not yet value sustainably managed indigenous forests, or non-commercial forests. Future updates of the monetary stock account may provide information on these categories.

The following file is available to download in Adobe Acrobat format. If you do not have the Adobe Acrobat Reader you may download the reader to view or print the contents of this file.

Physical and monetary flow account

The physical and monetary flow account contains information on the physical and monetary flows of forestry products through the New Zealand economy between 1996 and 2002. This report includes more specific information and more in-depth analysis on wood use of eight selected industries than in previous reports. It also takes an in-depth look into changes over time in exports and imports and changes in types of wood commodity being used.

The accompanying flow tables consist of supply and use tables, which present volume estimates in roundwood equivalents to enable comparisons between the various forestry products.

The forestry flow account is available to download in Adobe Acrobat format. If you do not have the Adobe Acrobat Reader you may download the reader to view or print the contents of this file. The forestry flow tables are available as Excel files (xls). If you can't open the xls files, click Excel Viewer free download.

Previous flow accounts

Previous physical flow and monetary flow accounts contain information on the physical and monetary flows of forestry products through the New Zealand economy between 1995 and 2000, and 1996-1999, respectively.

The physical and monetary flow account reports are available as Adobe PDF files. If you do not have the Adobe Acrobat Reader you may download the reader to view or print the contents of this file.

Page last modified on Monday, 7 November 2005

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