Bird species on public conservation land

  • Image, Bird species on public conservation land.

    The status of our bird communities is an important indicator of the condition of our ecosystems. Many indigenous birds play key ecological roles, including dispersing seeds and pollinating flowers. In some situations, exotic bird species (not indigenous to New Zealand) can partially fulfil these roles. Measuring the composition of bird communities across public conservation land allows us to monitor how they are changing over time.

    We classified Bird species on public conservation land as a case study.

    Key findings

    Between 2012 and 2013, indigenous bird species outnumbered exotic bird species in 99 percent (75 of 76) of forest sites distributed across public conservation land.

    • Three indigenous bird species (grey warbler, tomtit, and bellbird) and one exotic species (chaffinch) were detected in more than 75 percent of the forest sites.
    • At non-forest sites, there was no consistent pattern of dominance by either indigenous or exotic bird species.
    • 14 threatened bird species were detected in the forest and non-forest sites, with six of these species observed at only one location each.

    Figure 1

    Note: Non-forest sites include a range of habitats (eg sub-alpine shrublands, dunelands, high-country grassland, scrublands, braided riverbeds). Some bird species are typically found across only some of these non-forested habitats.

    Figure 2

    Figure 3

    Note: Non-forest sites include a range of habitats (eg sub-alpine shrublands, dunelands, high-country grassland, scrublands, braided riverbeds).

    Definition and methodology

    Information about bird species on public conservation land provides a snapshot of the make-up of bird communities in public conservation land.

    The information was collected by bird monitoring carried out between 2012 and 2013. The monitoring took place at 155 stations (79 non-forest sites and 76 forest sites) distributed across public conservation land.

    Non-forest sites include a range of habitats (eg sub-alpine shrub-lands, dunelands, high-country grassland, scrublands, braided riverbeds).

    Data quality

    We classified Bird species on public conservation land as a case study.

    Relevance

    relevance-direct This case study is a direct measure of the ‘Presence and abundance of indigenous plants and animals’ topic.

    Accuracy

    accuracy-medium The accuracy of the data source is of medium quality.

    See Data quality information for more detail.

     

    Published 21 October 2015

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