Changes in conservation status of indigenous species

  • Image, Changes in conservation status of indigenous species.

    The number of indigenous animal and plant species with a change in conservation status is reported as an impact of changes in the state of our freshwater, land, and marine environments. A change in a species’ conservation status reflects a change in its risk of extinction.

    We classified Changes in conservation status of indigenous species as a case study.

    Key findings

    In 2011, 799 indigenous plant and animal species were identified as being threatened with extinction.

    • Between 2005 and 2008–11, the conservation status changed for 71 of the 799 threatened indigenous species (8.9 percent).
    • 12 species (1.5 percent) genuinely improved, and their risk of extinction reduced. A genuine change in conservation status reflects a change in a species’ population numbers or distribution.
    • 59 species (7.4 percent) genuinely worsened, and their risk of extinction increased.
    • Species with increased risk of extinction are found in freshwater, land, and marine environments.

    Definition and methodology

    This is a measure of the number of species that showed genuine changes in their conservation status between the two New Zealand Threat Classification System (NZTCS) listing cycles of 2005 and 2008–11.

    The NZTCS helps quantify the risk of all indigenous plants, animals, and fungi becoming extinct. The Department of Conservation developed the NZTCS to provide a national system similar to the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) Red List. The NZTCS is used to monitor the status of individual species and report on the state of indigenous biodiversity.

    A genuine change in conservation status reflects a change in a species’ population numbers or distribution. A species’ conservation status can also change as a result of changes in available information, the classification system, or taxonomy.

    Data quality

    We classified Changes in conservation status of indigenous species as a case study.

    Relevance

    relevance-partial This case study is a partial measure of the ‘Impacts on biodiversity’ topic.

    Accuracy

    accuracy-high The accuracy of the data source is of high quality.

    See Data quality information for more detail.

     

    Published 21 October 2015

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