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Appendix 2: Definitions of terms used in this report

Adult: a person who is usually resident in New Zealand and is aged 15 years or over.

Child: a person who is usually resident in New Zealand and is aged under 15 years.

Disabled person: someone with an impairment that has a long-term, limiting effect on their ability to carry out day-to-day activities. ‘Long-term’ is defined as six months or longer. ‘Limiting effect’ means a restriction or lack of ability to perform day-to-day activities. People were not considered to have a disability if an assistive device (such as glasses or crutches) eliminated their impairment.

Discrimination: to be discriminated against means to be treated unfairly or differently from other people.

Employed: people in the working-age population who, during the week ended 3 March 2013, did at least one of the following:

  • worked for pay, profit, or income for an hour or more
  • worked without pay in a family business or family farm
  • usually worked in a job, business, or farm, but were not working during the week ended 3 March 2013 for some reason.

Employed full-time: usually working 30 or more hours per week.

Employed part-time: usually working fewer than 30 hours per week.

Employment rate: the number of employed people as a percentage of the number of people in the working-age population.

Household: either one person who usually resides alone, or two or more people who usually reside together and share facilities (eg an eating, cooking, or living area, bathroom, and toilet) in a private dwelling.

Household income: the combined total personal income of each member of the household aged 15 years and over.

Labour force: people in the working-age population who, during the week ended 3 March 2013, were either ‘employed’ or ‘unemployed’.

Labour force participation rate: the number or people in the labour force as a percentage of the number of people in the working-age population.

Māori: the Māori ethnic group population comprises those people who specified ‘Māori’ as either their sole ethnic group, or as one of several ethnic groups, in the 2013 Census.

Not in the labour force: people of working age who were neither employed nor unemployed. This includes those who: were retired; had personal or family responsibilities, such as unpaid housework and childcare; attended at least one educational institution; were permanently unable to work; were temporarily unavailable for work in the week ended 3 March 2013; were not actively seeking work.

NZDep quintiles: the NZDep2013 index uses a range of information from the census to score neighbourhoods or small areas according to their level of socio-economic deprivation. These deprivation scores are used to rank areas from high to low and divide them into quintiles, each representing a fifth of all areas in the country, from quintile 1 (the least deprived 20 percent of all areas) to quintile 5 (the most deprived 20 percent).

Personal income: the before-tax income of a person in the 12 months ended 31 March 2013.

Qualification: a formally recognised award for educational or training attainment. In general, a qualification is defined as requiring full-time equivalent study of three months or more.

Statistical significance: the difference between estimates for two groups is described as ‘statistically significant’ if the probability that it occurred by chance alone is low. Statistical significance is usually expressed in terms of a p-value. The smaller the p-value, the less likely it is the results are due to chance (and more likely the results are true). We used a p-value of 0.05 to identify statistically significant findings in this report. Differences discussed in the report are statistically significant unless otherwise stated. However, some differences between categories shown on graphs may not be statistically significant.

Tenure of household: indicates whether a household in a private dwelling rents, owns, or holds that dwelling in a family trust, and whether payment is made by the household for the right to reside in that dwelling. A dwelling held in a family trust is owned by the family trust, so the household does not directly own the dwelling.

Unemployed: people in the working-age population who, during the week ended 3 March 2013, were without a paid job and:

  • were available for work and had actively sought work in the four weeks ended 3 March 2013
  • had a new job to start within the next four weeks.

If a person’s only job-search method was to read job advertisements then they are not considered to be actively seeking work.

Unemployment rate: the number of unemployed people as a percentage of the number of people in the labour force.

Working-age population: the usually resident, non-institutionalised, civilian population of New Zealand aged 15 years and over on census night.

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