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Conclusion

The 2013 New Zealand Disability Survey shows that Māori have a relatively high rate of disability for a population with a young age structure.

It also shows that disabled Māori tend to fare more poorly than other Māori across a range of outcomes related to material well-being and quality of life. Given that Māori in general tend to fare worse than non-Māori on most of these measures, disabled Māori are particularly vulnerable to poor outcomes.

The picture for disabled Māori is not an entirely negative one, with many experiencing good social and economic outcomes. The Disability Survey found that almost half were employed; most had an income that was adequate for their everyday needs; almost half owned their own homes; most felt safe in their neighbourhoods and had no recent experiences of crime or discrimination; most had sufficient contact with family and friends; most reported their health as good or better; and most reported a high level of satisfaction with their lives.

However, the clear disparities in well-being outcomes between disabled and non-disabled Māori show that considerable progress is still required to meet the objectives of the New Zealand Disability Strategy and the Māori Disability Action Plan, Whāia Te Ao Mārama. Monitoring the well-being of disabled Māori is a vitally important part of this process, and one in which information from the Disability Survey plays a key role.

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