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Personal security

This chapter describes issues of personal security for disabled Māori, specifically their feelings of safety, experiences of crime, and experiences of discrimination.

About personal security and well-being

Personal security depends on living and working in safe environments and feeling free from threats of physical, emotional, and economic harm. Feelings of personal security are important to people’s sense of well-being, while threats to that security can cause stress and anxiety which is detrimental to their quality of life (OECD, 2011, p240).

Feelings of safety

Almost all Māori adults, whether disabled or not, said they felt safe when alone at home during the day or night, and also when out in their neighbourhood by themselves during the day. However, disabled Māori were less likely than non-disabled Māori to have been out in their neighbourhood alone after dark, and those who had were less likely to feel safe doing so (75 percent of disabled adults compared with 83 percent of non-disabled).

Among disabled Māori, women were less likely than men to feel safe alone after dark, particularly when out in their neighbourhood: 62 percent of disabled Māori women felt safe alone in the neighbourhood after dark, compared with 88 percent of disabled Māori men.

Experience of crime

Sixteen percent of disabled Māori adults said they had been victims of crime in the previous 12 months, including 8 percent who were victims of violent crime. Although few disabled Māori had experienced violent crime, they were significantly more likely to have done so than non-disabled Māori (3 percent).

Among disabled Māori, age and sex made little difference in the proportions of people who had experienced crime.

Figure 9

Experience of discrimination

The Disability Survey asked adults whether they felt they had experienced discrimination in the last 12 months. The question did not refer specifically to discrimination related to disability, so responses may have included discrimination on grounds such as ethnicity, sex, or age. But the experience of discrimination was more common among disabled than non-disabled Māori, suggesting that disability is a factor in discrimination.

Although less than a quarter (23 percent) of disabled Māori adults said they had experienced discrimination in the last 12 months, this was much higher than the figure of 13 percent among non-disabled Māori. Thirteen percent of all disabled Māori adults said they had experienced discrimination more than three times during that period, compared with six percent of non-disabled Māori.

Among disabled Māori, there was little difference in the proportions of men and women who said they had experienced discrimination. However, there was some difference by age, with those aged under 45 being more likely than older people to say they had experienced discrimination.

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