Stats NZ has a new website.

For new releases go to

www.stats.govt.nz

As we transition to our new site, you'll still find some Stats NZ information here on this archive site.

  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+
Social connections

This chapter describes social connections for disabled Māori in terms of their contact with family and friends, feelings of loneliness, and participation in leisure activities.

About social connections and well-being

Social connections contribute to well-being in a variety of ways. Regular contact with others and good relationships with family and friends can provide intrinsic satisfaction, while social networks can be a source of practical and emotional support, and conducive to participation in leisure and other activities (OECD, 2011, p170).

These social networks can be especially important for disabled people, who may have distinctive needs for various forms of support. This is recognised in the New Zealand Disability Strategy, which has an objective to “value families, whānau and people providing ongoing support” to disabled people, as well as supporting their participation in recreation and cultural activities (Minister for Disability Issues, 2001, p23, 29).

Contact with family and friends

The 2013 Disability Survey found that the vast majority of disabled Māori adults had contact with family and friends in the last four weeks:

  • 84 percent had face-to-face contact with family
  • 90 percent had non face-to-face contact with family
  • 87 percent had face-to-face contact with friends
  • 85 percent had non face-to-face contact with friends

Most were satisfied with the amount of contact: 63 percent felt that the amount of contact with their family was about right, while 72 percent felt that the amount of contact with friends was about right.

By comparison with non-disabled Māori, those who were disabled were slightly less likely to have had contact with family and friends in the last four weeks. Satisfaction with the amount of contact with friends was similar among disabled and non-disabled Māori, but those who were disabled were less likely to feel that the amount of contact with family was about right (63 percent compared with 71 percent of non-disabled Māori).

Feelings of loneliness

Feelings of loneliness were more common among disabled than non-disabled Māori. Four in ten disabled Māori adults said they had felt lonely at least occasionally in the last four weeks, compared with three in ten non-disabled Māori. It was rare for people to say they often felt lonely, but more common among disabled people (8 percent) than non-disabled people (2 percent).

The response varied by age, with almost half of disabled Māori adults under the age of 45 saying they had felt lonely over the last four weeks, compared with around a third of those in older age groups. Under the age of 65 it was much more common for disabled than non-disabled Māori to have felt lonely, but in the 65-plus age group there was little difference between disabled and non-disabled.

Figure 10

Leisure activities

The Disability Survey asked people about their participation in a range of leisure activities, most of which involved social contact. Disabled Māori were less likely than non-disabled Māori to have participated in most of these activities, although in some cases the differences were relatively small. The largest differences tended to be participation in physical activities.

Children

Among disabled Māori children, the most common activities in the last four weeks were going out with family or friends (93 percent), and visiting friends (79 percent). Most had also been away on holiday in the last 12 months (69 percent).
The biggest differences between disabled and non-disabled Māori children were participation in physical activities: playing a team sport (48 percent of disabled children compared with 64 percent of non-disabled children), and other physical activity such as swimming or gymnastics (47 percent of disabled children compared with 63 percent of non-disabled children). 

Figure 11

Adults

Among disabled Māori adults, by far the most common activity in the previous four weeks was going to a café, restaurant, or pub (62 percent), followed by voluntary work (36 percent), and spectating at a sports event (35 percent). Almost half (44 percent) had also been away on holiday in the last 12 months.

Disabled Māori were less likely than non-disabled Māori to have participated in most of the activities we asked them about, with the exception of voluntary work where the proportions were similar for disabled and non-disabled. Proportionally, the biggest difference was in playing sport, with non-disabled Māori being almost twice as likely as disabled Māori to have participated.

Figure 12

  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+
Top
  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+