Stats NZ has a new website.

For new releases go to

www.stats.govt.nz

As we transition to our new site, you'll still find some Stats NZ information here on this archive site.

  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+
Overall well-being

Self-assessed health status

Disabled people were far less likely to say they had very good or excellent health – only 10 percent said their health was excellent compared with 33 percent of non-disabled people.

Disabled people were more likely than non-disabled to say their health was good or fair/poor. Over a quarter (29 percent) rated their health fair or poor compared with only 4 percent of non-disabled people. These patterns were similar for men and women.

Within the disabled population, there is no evidence of any difference between males and females in terms of self-assessed health.

Bar graph showing self-assessed health status by disability status in 2013. Health status on x axis, percent of adults on y axis. Disabled people were far less likely to say they had very good or excellent health.

An overall health status rating of excellent was more likely for disabled children (29 percent) than disabled adults 15+ (8 percent). An overall health status rating of fair or poor was less likely for disabled children (14 percent) than disabled adults 15+ (30 percent).

Overall life satisfaction

Life satisfaction is measured on a scale of 0 to 10, where 0 is the lowest and 10 is the highest level of satisfaction.

While the majority of adults rated their overall life satisfaction at 8 or higher, disabled adults were far less likely than non-disabled adults to report this (55 percent for disabled compared with 72 percent for non-disabled).

Disabled adults were also more likely than non-disabled to report an overall life satisfaction below 5 (7 percent compared with 2 percent of non-disabled). This pattern was similar for men and women.

Bar graph showing overall life satisfaction for disabled adults 15 years and over by age group 15-44, 45-64 and 65 plus.  Percent of adults is on the y axis and life satisfaction is on the x axis.  Overall life satisfaction is a self-assessed measure of how a person felt about their life as a whole on a scale of 0 to 10, where 0 is the lowest and 10 is the highest level of satisfaction.  Life satisfaction is grouped into three categories on the graph: 0 to 4.9, 5 to 7.9 and 8 to 10. Graph shows that compared with younger disabled adults, disabled adults aged 65 plus were less likely to rate their overall life satisfaction score as below 5 and more likely to rate their overall life satisfaction as 8 or above.

Compared with younger disabled adults, those aged 65+ were less likely to rate their overall life satisfaction score as below 5 (4 percent) and more likely to rate their overall life satisfaction as 8 or above (67 percent).

  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+
Top
  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+