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Purpose and key points

Purpose

Social and economic outcomes for disabled people compares disabled and non-disabled people across a range of social and economic characteristics. We used the findings from the 2013 New Zealand Disability Survey to examine various life aspects such as employment, income, education, safety, social contact, and overall well-being.

Key points

In 2013:

  • The labour force participation rate for disabled adults was 50 percent, compared with 76 percent for non-disabled adults.
  • 45 percent of disabled adults were employed compared with 72 percent of non-disabled adults. Full-time work was more common among non-disabled adults.
  • 64 percent of disabled adults had an annual gross income of $30,000 or lower, compared with 45 percent of non-disabled adults. In contrast, only 18 percent of disabled adults received an annual income higher than $50,000 compared with 33 percent of non-disabled adults.
  • Disabled people were less likely to hold a formal qualification, with 67 percent holding a school or tertiary qualification. This compared with 85 percent of non-disabled adults.
  • Disabled adults were less likely than non-disabled adults to go out after dark alone and, when they did so, they were less likely to feel safe.
  • Discrimination was experienced by more disabled adults than non-disabled adults and was also experienced more often by disabled people.
  • 38 percent of disabled adults said they had felt lonely, at least occasionally, in the past four weeks, compared with 29 percent of non-disabled adults.
  • Disabled adults and children were less likely to participate in many popular leisure activities than their non-disabled peers.
  • 10 percent of disabled people said their health was excellent compared with 33 percent of non-disabled people.
  • On a scale of 0–10, disabled adults were less likely to report a life satisfaction score greater than 8 (55 percent). This compared with 72 percent of non-disabled adults.
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