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Building Consents Issued: March 2017
Embargoed until 10:45am  –  28 April 2017
Commentary

Figures given are not adjusted for seasonal fluctuations unless otherwise stated. Values include GST and are not adjusted for inflation.

Dwelling consents decrease slightly in March

The seasonally adjusted number of new dwellings consented fell 1.8 percent in March, following a 17 percent rise in February.

For houses only, the seasonally adjusted number fell 5.2 percent, following a rise of 14 percent in February.

In actual terms, 2,779 new dwellings were consented in March 2017 (up 20 percent from March 2016):

  • 1,923 houses
  • 407 townhouses, flats, and units
  • 252 apartments
  • 197 retirement village units.

The regions consenting the most new dwellings were:

  • Auckland – 942 (up 20 percent from March 2016 due to an increase for apartments)
  • Canterbury – 491 (down 5.6 percent)
  • Waikato – 319 (up 16 percent).

Graph, New dwellings consented, by region, March month, 2015 to 2017.

Over 30,000 new dwellings consented annually

In the year ended March 2017, 30,626 new dwellings were consented – the most for a March year since 2004. However, this is still well below the all-time high of 40,025 new dwellings consented in the year ended February 1974.

In the March 2017 year, Auckland consented 10,199 new dwellings – the most for a March year since 2005.

Graph, New dwellings consented, year ended March 1967 to 2017.

Dwellings trend shows signs of increasing

The trend for the number of new dwellings consented is showing signs of increasing. It reached a 12-year high in mid-2016, but decreased towards the end of the year.

Graph, Trend for new dwellings consented, monthly, January 2001 to March 2017.

Four of the six regional trends appear to be decreasing. However, these regional trends are quite volatile, and are revised each month.

In Canterbury, the trend has fallen 38 percent since the series peak in late 2014 as the post-earthquake residential rebuild winds down.

Graph, Trend for new dwellings consented, by region, monthly, January 2001 to March 2017.

Value of non-residential consents reaches record high

The total value of non-residential building consents issued in March 2017 was $837 million – a record high (up $377 million from March 2016).

The main contributing building types were:

  • offices, administation, and public transport buildings – $191 million (up $92 million from March 2016)
  • hotels, motels, and other short-term accommodation – $167 million (up $141 million, boosted by a consent for the Park Hyatt Hotel in Auckland)
  • hospital, nursing homes, and other health buildings – $104 million (up $68 million)
  • shops, restaurants, and bars – $102 million (up $61 million).

Graph, Value of non-residential buildings consented, by building type (including alterations and additions), March month, 2015 to 2017.

The main contributing regions were:

  • Auckland – $379 million
  • Canterbury – $187 million
  • Wellington – $72 million
  • Waikato – $48 million.

Consents for all buildings total $2.0 billion in March

Including alterations, consents for all buildings totalled $2.0 billion in March 2017:

  • $1.2 billion for residential buildings
  • $837 million for non-residential buildings.

All of these values were record highs, however, they are not adjusted for inflation.

In the year ended March 2017, consents for all buildings totalled $19.1 billion (up 14 percent from the March 2016 year):

  • $12.7 billion for residential buildings (up 15 percent)
  • $6.5 billion for non-residential buildings (up 11 percent).

Graph, Value of buildings consented, including alterations and additions, year ended March 2013 to 2017.

Find data tables

For more detailed data, see the Excel tables in the 'Downloads' box.

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