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About the tourism satellite account

Purpose

Tourism Satellite Account: 2016 provides a picture of the role tourism plays in New Zealand, with information on the changing levels and impact of tourism activity. It presents information on tourism's contribution to the New Zealand economy in terms of expenditure and employment. Results cover provisional figures for the years ended March 2014–16 and detailed results for 2013.

Developed and published by Statistics New Zealand, the tourism satellite account is compiled under a United Nations World Tourism Organization framework and funded by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment. It is part of a core set of tourism data that provides base information for understanding and monitoring tourism activity in New Zealand. Other elements of the core dataset include surveys of spending by international and domestic visitors, visitor arrival and accommodation statistics, and forecasts of tourist numbers and expenditure.

What is a tourism satellite account?

A tourism satellite account integrates data about the supply and use of tourism-related goods and services into a single format. It summarises the contribution tourism makes to production and employment, consistent and integrated with New Zealand’s official national accounts. This ensures that the importance of the tourism sector is measured and understood in the context of the New Zealand economy as a whole. New Zealand’s tourism satellite account (TSA) measures expenditure in New Zealand by both resident and non-resident tourists, and thus gives a picture of the overall size of the tourism industry, including its contribution to gross domestic product (GDP) and employment.

Tourism, unlike ‘conventional’ industries, such as agriculture or manufacturing, that are classified according to the goods and services they produce, is defined by the characteristics of the customer demanding tourism products. Tourism products can cut across standard industry definitions, and therefore require a different approach.

Satellite accounts are an extension of the core national accounts, and involve rearranging existing information in the national accounts so that an area of particular economic or social importance can be analysed more closely. As extensions of the core system of national accounts, satellite accounts are an important recommendation of the international standard, the System of National Accounts 2008 (Inter-Secretariat Working Group on National Accounts, 2008).

We present both final and provisional estimates in Tourism Satellite Account: 2016. The supply and use framework provides a detailed picture of the economy broken down by industry, product, primary input, and final demand categories. It is the starting point for deriving final accounts. To give a more timely picture of the impact of tourism, we prepare provisional TSAs, using fewer data sources than final year estimates. The provisional estimates are presented in a less detailed format, and are revised as relevant data sources become available. As balanced supply and use tables are completed for the relevant years (as part of the ongoing production of the New Zealand System of National Accounts), we replace provisional results with final year estimates.

Tourism Satellite Account: 2016 presents results for the years ended March 2014–16 at the aggregated provisional estimate level in current prices. Appendix 5 contains detailed results for the latest final account year (year ended March 2013).

Value added

Value added is the ‘value’ businesses add to the goods and services they purchase (intermediate inputs) and use in producing their own outputs. The measurement of tourism’s direct value added, also known as tourism’s direct contribution to GDP, is the major focus of the TSA. As direct value added for tourism is measured on the same basis as that used for industries in the national accounts, it enables a consistent comparison between the tourism industry’s contribution to GDP and that of more traditional industries such as agriculture and construction.

Direct value added does not measure the full impact of tourism on the New Zealand economy because it is limited to businesses that have a direct relationship with tourists. Additional value added comes from tourism through producing the intermediate inputs used in producing goods and services sold to tourists, although there is no direct relationship between the producer of the intermediate inputs and the tourist. This additional value added is known as indirect value added.

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