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Tourism supply

The tourism supply of an industry is derived by summing the value of tourism products sold by that industry. The value of tourism product sales is derived by multiplying the total supply (national production plus imports) by its corresponding tourism product ratio.

In the absence of supply and use tables for the years ended March 2014–16, we derived an initial value of supply by product by industry for the same period from a variety of sources (covered in detail in appendix 2 ‘Methodology’). In table 11, supply by product is shown only for tourism-characteristic industries (refer appendix 1 ‘Conceptual framework’).

Total supply and tourism supply by product are shown in table 11 for the years ended March 2013–16.

Points to note from table 11:

  • Goods and services can be consumed/purchased by tourists and non-tourists. The tourism product ratio indicates the proportion of a product's supply that is purchased by tourists. In 2016, for example, the tourism product ratio for accommodation services was 0.99. This means that almost all accommodation available was purchased by tourists. In contrast, tourists purchased only 0.19 of retail supplies of fuel and other automotive products.
  • Tourism supply increased 12.1 percent in the March 2016 year. From 2013 to 2016, tourism supply increased at a faster rate than total supply (28.6 percent compared with 13.3 percent over this period).
  • Imports sold directly to tourists represented 10.8 percent of total tourism supply in the March 2016 year, compared with 10.3 percent in the year ended March 2013.

Download tables 1–16 (Excel, 16 sheets, 154kb)

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