Stats NZ has a new website.

For new releases go to

www.stats.govt.nz

As we transition to our new site, you'll still find some Stats NZ information here on this archive site.

  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+
Internet Service Provider Survey: 2012
Embargoed until 10:45am  –  12 October 2012
Commentary

Rise in higher data caps

More choice and flexibility from Internet service providers (ISPs) saw an increase in the number of subscribers with higher data caps this year. In just one year, the total number of subscribers with a data cap of 20 gigabytes (GB) or more increased by almost 500,000. This group now makes up more than 50 percent of subscribers.

While the numbers continue to rise for higher caps, those with lower data caps (less than 20GB) dropped about 40 percent to 600,000 subscribers, down from just under 1 million in 2011. Overall, the number of subscribers with a data cap increased 7 percent this year. The total number without a data cap increased 275 percent.

Graph, Internet subscription data cap, broadband subscribers, as at June 2010, June 2011, and June 2012.

With the increasing availability of higher data cap (and no data cap) plans, we are starting to enjoy unlimited digital streaming of movies and TV shows. In June 2012, the average subscriber consumed an estimated 16GB of data, compared with 9GB last year. This is equivalent to streaming 61 more episodes of Shortland Street per month than we did this time a year ago.

Kiwis connected on the go

Increased smartphone use and our urge to connect to the Internet wherever we go saw the total number of mobile handset subscriber numbers rise. The total number of mobile broadband users increased 34 percent this year, to more than 2.5 million – more than half the population.

Graph, Total mobile handset subscribers, as at June 2011 and June 2012.

Fibre optics grow faster

Ninety-three percent of fixed Internet subscribers are using a broadband connection. The total number of broadband customers increased by 11 percent this year, to more than 1.6 million.

Graph, Total broadband subscribers, as at June 2010, June 2011, and June 2012.

The total number of subscribers in the cellular, cable, and satellite broadband connections category increased by 18 percent this year, to more than 400,000 subscribers. Fibre optic subscriber numbers increased by 46 percent, from 3,700 in 2011 to 5,400 subscribers this year. Digital subscriber line (DSL) still remains the most popular connection type, with a 9 percent increase to more than 1.1 million subscribers this year.

Graph, Broadband subscribers by connection type, as at June 2010, June 2011, and June 2012.

Our need for speed

The majority of subscribers (96 percent) are downloading data at speeds between 1.5 to 24 megabits per second (Mbps), up from 86 percent in this speed category last year. The total number of subscribers in the lowest downloading speed category (less than 1.5 Mbps) decreased to just 2 percent, compared with 12 percent in 2011.

Graph, Internet download speeds, broadband subscribers, as at June 2010, June 2011, and June 2012.

Uploading speeds are continuing to rise, with 27 percent of broadband subscribers in the '1.5 Mbps or more' category, compared with 18 percent in 2011.

Although the majority of subscribers are still in the lower uploading speed category (less than 1.5 Mbps), the number of subscribers signing up for lower speeds is rising at a lower rate than those signing up for higher speeds. The total number of subscribers in the 'less than 1.5 Mbps' category rose 3 percent in the past two years, while those in the '1.5 Mbps or more' category rose more than 180 percent.

Graph, Internet upload speeds, broadband subscribers, as at June 2010, June 2011, and June 2012.

Keeping customers safe

Fifty percent of ISPs monitor the traffic in their customers’ accounts for signs of compromised security, including botnets, pharming, phishing, and trojans. Only 1 percent showed signs of compromised security, compared with 3 percent last year. One-third of the ISPs who monitored security threats reported that they most commonly monitored for botnets, followed closely by phishing and trojans equally.

A botnet is a collection of compromised computers that have been set up to forward transmissions (including spam or viruses) to other computers. Phishing is attempting to get information (such as credit card details and passwords) by acting as a trustworthy entity. A trojan is a type of harmful software that masquerades as a legitimate file or helpful program to gain unauthorised access to a computer. See the Definitions section for more detail.

Graph, Internet security monitoring, dial-up and broadband subscribers, June 2012.

For more detailed data see the Excel tables in the 'Downloads' box.

  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+
Top
  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+