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New Zealand General Social Survey: 2008
Embargoed until 10:45am  –  29 October 2009
Commentary

The New Zealand General Social Survey

This is the first release of information gathered by the New Zealand General Social Survey (NZGSS).

The NZGSS provides data on key social and economic outcomes of New Zealanders aged 15 years and over. The NZGSS provides new information about how people think they are faring, which complements other objective information about their situation such as labour force status, income, and material standard of living.

The NZGSS is an important monitoring tool for areas that receive considerable government funding. Increasingly, government seeks to act in a coordinated way across agencies and this survey contributes to that goal. In particular, the survey enables a view of those with multiple good and/or bad outcomes.

As the depth of information that the NZGSS provides cannot all be covered in this Hot Off the Press, a selection of measures are presented instead. The selected measures represent various aspects of people's lives:

  • financial well-being
  • health
  • housing and neighbourhood
  • safety and security
  • social contact and isolation
  • participation in voluntary and unpaid work
  • environment
  • overall life satisfaction.

These measures are considered against a series of population groups: sex, age, ethnicity, family type, education, labour force status, household income, tenure, and region.

The NZGSS was in the field from April 2008 to March 2009 and its achieved sample size was 8,721 people. The survey will be repeated every two years to measure changes over time and respond to changing information needs.

Total population

  • Over 80 percent of people reported that they had adequate money to meet their everyday needs for things such as accommodation, food, clothing, and other necessities.
  • Most people (88 percent) said they had excellent, very good, or good general health.
  • Half of people reported one or more major problems relating to their house, street, or neighbourhood.

 

  • The two most common problems with housing were related to sufficient size and to heating.

 

  • The most common neighbourhood problem was noise or vibration.
  • One-third of New Zealanders said they felt unsafe or very unsafe walking alone in their neighbourhoods at night.
  • Almost everyone (96 percent) said they could get support in a time of crisis from someone living in another household.
  • Less than half of people (41 percent) lived in households that had stored a three-day supply of water in case of emergency.
  • Over 90 percent of people agreed or strongly agreed that it is good that people in New Zealand can have different values and ways of living.
  • 1 in 10 people reported that they had been discriminated against in some way in the past 12 months.
  • More than 80 percent of people had some sort of contact with non-resident family (ie those not living in the same household), and more than 90 percent with non-resident friends, at least once in the last four weeks.

 

  • Despite this, one-quarter of people felt they did not have enough contact with their non-resident family and one-fifth reported not having enough contact with non-resident friends.
  • Four percent of people reported feeling isolated from those around them all or most of the time in the last four weeks.
  • One-third of people had undertaken voluntary work for a group or organisation in the last four weeks, and about two-thirds had done unpaid work for someone outside of their household.
  • Almost three-quarters of people lived in households that recycled all or most of those things they knew could be recycled.
  • Just over half of people lived in households that did things to minimise energy use all or most of the time.

 

  • People who lived in households that minimised energy use for environmental (as compared with non-environmental) reasons tended to be those people that were better off financially.
  • Most New Zealanders (86 percent) reported that they were satisfied or very satisfied with their life overall.

Results for New Zealanders’ self-assessed health status are broadly comparable with results from Australia (2006), the United Kingdom (2007), and from the 2006/07 New Zealand Health Survey. Results for level of access to support in a time of crisis are broadly comparable with those of Australians’ (2006).

The high level of overall life satisfaction is also broadly comparable with other countries, including Canada (2008), the United Kingdom (2008), and Australia (2007).

Selected NZGSS Measures
For the total population
April 2008–March 2009
Measure Population (%)
Financial well-being
Personal income
     $70,001 or more 12.2
     $30,001–$70,000 36.1
     $30,000 or less 51.6
Adequacy of income to meet everyday needs(1)
     More than enough 13.7
     Enough / just enough 71.8
     Not enough 14.5
Self-assessed general health status
     Excellent / very good / good 87.5
     Fair / poor 12.5
Major problem with house / neighbourhood
     Have a major problem 51.2
Safety and security
     Very safe / safe walking alone in neighbourhood at night 52.4
     Can access support in a time of crisis(2) 96.4
     Household has stored emergency water 40.7
     Experienced discrimination in last 12 months 10.1
Social contact and isolation
     Had face-to-face contact with family(3) 83.7
          At least once a week(4) 66.0
     Had non-face-to-face contact with family(3) 95.8
          At least once a week(4) 79.6
     Felt isolated from others most / all of time in last four weeks 3.6
Voluntary and unpaid work
     Undertook voluntary work(5) 32.6
     Undertook unpaid work(6) 64.6
Environment
     Household recycles all / most recyclable items 73.9
     Household minimises energy use all / most of the time 53.9
Overall life satisfaction
     Very satisfied / satisfied 85.8

(1) Only asked of people aged 18 years and over, and includes partner's income where applicable.
(2) From someone living in another household.
(3) Living in another household during the past four weeks.
(4) Percentage is of those who had contact.
(5) For a group or organisation in the last four weeks.
(6) For someone living in another household in the last four weeks.
Note: Related measures have been grouped under topic headings, but do not cover the entire topic. Data users can access a wider array of measures relating to the topics in the NZGSS dataset.


Sex

  • Adequacy of income to meet everyday needs was similar for both males and females.
  • Females were over one-and-a-half times more likely than males to live in a household with a total annual income of $30,000 or less.
  • Males and females were equally likely to be able to access support in a time of crisis from someone who did not live with them.
  • Females were three times more likely than males to feel unsafe or very unsafe when walking alone in their neighbourhood at night.
  • Although the overall rate of discrimination was similar for males and females, females reported gender discrimination more frequently than males.
  • While around two-thirds of both males and females had undertaken unpaid work for someone living in another household in the last four weeks, the frequency with which they had undertaken unpaid work differed – females were more likely than males to have undertaken unpaid work at least once a week, and males were more likely than females to have undertaken unpaid work just once in the four-week period.
  • Overall life satisfaction and self-assessed general health status results were similar for males and females.

Across all the reported population groups, females showed one of the highest rates of feeling unsafe or very unsafe walking alone at night in their neighbourhoods.

Graph, Feeling of safety when walking alone in the neighbourhood at night, by sex.

Selected NZGSS Measures
By sex

Measure Males Females
Percent
Distribution 48.5 51.5
Do not have enough money to meet everyday needs(1) 13.5  15.5 
Fair / poor health 11.7 13.3
Have a major problem with house / neighbourhood 49.2 53.1
Very safe / safe walking alone in neighbourhood at night 69.5 35.0
Household has stored emergency water 43.0 38.6
Experienced discrimination in the last 12 months 11.1 9.2
Had face-to-face contact with family(2)  83.0 84.4
Felt isolated from others most / all of time in last four weeks 3.0 4.3
Undertook voluntary work(3) 32.6 32.6
Household recycles all / most recyclable items 72.6 75.2
Very satisfied / satisfied with life overall 85.1 86.5
(1) Only asked of people aged 18 years and over, and includes partner's income where applicable.
(2) Living in another household during the past four weeks.
(3) For a group or organisation in the last four weeks.
Note: Apart from the sex distribution, all percentages refer to the proportion of people in each group who reported the specific state or behaviour.

 Age

  • People in the young adult (those aged 15 to 24 years), prime working age (those aged 25 to 44 years), and middle age (those aged 45 to 64 years) groups were around two to two-and-a-half times more likely than older people (those aged 65 years and over) to report inadequate income to meet their everyday needs.
  • People of prime working age were almost twice as likely as older people to have a major housing or neighbourhood problem.
  • Of those who said they had been discriminated against in the last 12 months, only 8 percent thought it was because of their age.
  • Young adults were the most likely of any age groups to have had at least weekly contact with non-residential friends.
  • Older people were the most likely to say they had about the right amount of contact with their non-residential friends (older people were also the most likely to be satisfied with the amount of non-residential family contact).
  • While the proportion of people who were very satisfied or satisfied with life overall was high across all age groups, older people were slightly more likely to be very satisfied or satisfied than people of prime working or middle age.

Important life cycle changes such as raising children, entering and leaving the workforce, and the experience of aging all influence social and economic outcomes. Differences between the age groups may also be driven by cohort effects, that is, they may reflect the different life experiences of the generations.

Changes in home-ownership trends, the housing market, and housing quality awareness mean that the housing problems identified by the NZGSS may have less to do with typical stages in life cycles and more to do with cohort effects – time-bound impacts that affect particular generations. However, the greater likelihood of housing and neighbourhood problems for those in the prime working age group may reflect transitions to home-ownership, disaffection with renting, and the impact of having children on housing needs.

The life satisfaction pattern over the life cycle follows similar trends to those of overseas studies.

Graph, People who were very satisfied / satisfied with life overall, by age.

---PDF BREAK---

Selected NZGSS Measures
By age
Measure Young adults (15–24 years) Prime working age (25–44 years) Middle age (45–64 years) Older people (65 years and over)
Percent
Distribution 18.2 34.9 31.6 15.3
Do not have enough money to meet everyday needs(1) 20.2 15.8 14.2 7.8
Fair / poor health 9.8 8.9 14.0 21.1
Have a major problem with house / neighbourhood 54.3 60.6 48.2 32.3
Very safe / safe walking alone in neighbourhood at night 50.9 54.0 55.3 42.7
Household has stored emergency water 34.8 35.0 45.5 51.0
Experienced discrimination in the last 12 months 15.1 11.6 9.3 2.7
Had face-to-face contact with family(2) 81.6 82.9 84.1 87.3
Felt isolated from others most / all of time in last four weeks 4.1 4.9 2.3 2.9
Undertook voluntary work(3) 27.0 30.8 36.4 35.6
Household recycles all / most recyclable items 70.8 73.1 74.2 79.0
Very satisfied / satisfied with life overall 87.0 85.3 83.2 90.9
(1) Only asked of people aged 18 years and over, and includes partner's income where applicable.
(2) Living in another household during the past four weeks.
(3) For a group or organisation in the last four weeks.
Note: Apart from the age distribution, all percentages refer to the proportion of people in each group who reported the specific state or behaviour.

Note: Ten-year age breakdowns are included in the ‘Tables’ section.
---PDF BREAK---

Ethnicity

  • Europeans were less likely than Māori, Asian, or Pacific peoples to report that they did not have enough money to meet everyday needs.
  • Māori and Pacific peoples (62 percent of each) were more likely to report major problems with their house or neighbourhood than Europeans (49 percent).
  • Māori and Asian people were two-to-three times more likely to report discrimination than Europeans.
  • The most common reasons given for why people thought they had been discriminated against were their ‘nationality, race, or ethnic group’, or their ‘skin colour’.
  • European, Māori, and Pacific peoples were one-and-a-half times more likely than Asian people to have had face-to-face contact with non-resident family in the last four weeks.
  • Pacific peoples (42 percent) were more likely than European (32 percent) or Asian (28 percent) people to report doing volunteer work in the last four weeks.

People were asked which ethnic group or groups they belonged to, and were therefore able to identify with more than one ethnic group.

Ethnic groups have different age structures and immigration patterns that can have some impact on high-level outcomes. For example, the Māori, Pacific, and Asian ethnic groups have younger median age structures than the European grouping. In addition to differing age structures, differences in voluntary work participation rates are likely to be influenced by Pacific peoples greater participation in church-related activities.

The higher proportion of recent migrants in the Asian ethnic group is likely to be a contributing factor to a lower rate of face-to-face contact with non-resident family.

---PDF BREAK---

Selected NZGSS Measures
By ethnicity
Measure European Māori Pacific Asian
Percent
Distribution(1) 78.9 12.6 4.5 8.6
Do not have enough money to meet everyday needs(2) 11.5 25.3 31.3 20.3
Fair / poor health 12.1 15.4 12.0 11.9
Have a major problem with house / neighbourhood 49.3 62.4 62.1 56.0
Very safe / safe walking alone in neighbourhood at night 52.6 56.1 52.7 45.6
Household has stored emergency water 41.2 37.5 41.3 34.3
Experienced discrimination in the last 12 months 7.9 16.0 14.1 23.2
Had face-to-face contact with family(3) 86.4 89.8 90.6 54.1
Felt isolated from others most / all of time in last four weeks 3.4 4.7 5.3* 3.4*
Undertook voluntary work(4) 32.1 34.2 41.5 28.2
Household recycles all / most recyclable items 74.6 67.0 67.6 77.2
Very satisfied / satisfied with life overall 87.1 81.5 80.2 84.1
(1) People were able to identify with more than one ethnic group; therefore, percentages do not add up to 100.
(2) Only asked of people aged 18 years and over, and includes partner's income where applicable.
(3) Living in another household during the past four weeks.
(4) For a group or organisation in the last four weeks.
* Relative sampling error is greater than 50 percent.
Note: The classification groups 'Middle Eastern / Latin American / African' and 'Other' were too small for analysis. Apart from the ethnicity distribution, all percentages refer to the proportion of people in each group who reported the specific state or behaviour.
---PDF BREAK---

Family type

  • People in one-parent families were twice as likely to report not having enough money to meet everyday needs compared with those in couple-with-children families or who were not living in a family, and over four times as likely as couples without children.
  • People in couple-with-children families were twice as likely as those in couple-without-children families to say they did not have enough money to meet their everyday needs.
  • Major housing and neighbourhood problems were most often reported by people in one-parent families (64 percent), and least often by couples without children (43 percent).
  • People who lived in a family that included a couple, with or without children, were more satisfied with life overall than those who lived in a one-parent family or did not live in a family.

People living in family structures without children tend to be young couples or those who are older and whose children have left home (empty nesters). People who do not live in a family tend to be older people living alone and younger people who are flatting with others.

Across all the reported population groups, one-parent families showed one of the highest rates of income inadequacy. ---PDF BREAK---

Selected NZGSS Measures
By family type
Measure Couple without child(ren) Couple with child(ren) One parent with child(ren) Not in a family
Percent
Distribution 30.0 42.6 8.4 18.9
Do not have enough money to meet everyday needs(1) 7.7 15.0 34.7 16.7
Fair / poor health 12.3 8.7 17.6 19.3
Have a major problem with house / neighbourhood 43.1 54.2 63.7 51.8
Very safe / safe walking alone in neighbourhood at night 52.5 54.8 44.8 50.3
Household has stored emergency water 46.0 40.4 33.7 36.2
Experienced discrimination in the last 12 months 7.1 10.8 16.0 10.7
Had face-to-face contact with family(2) 87.5 82.1 84.9 80.8
Felt isolated from others most / all of time in last four weeks 1.9 3.6 6.2 5.3
Undertook voluntary work(3) 33.0 34.5 29.2 29.3
Household recycles all / most recyclable items 74.6 74.9 70.2 72.2
Very satisfied / satisfied with life overall 90.1 87.3 74.1 81.1

(1) Only asked of people aged 18 years and over, and includes partner's income where applicable.
(2) Living in another household during the past four weeks.
(3) For a group or organisation in the last four weeks.
Note: Apart from the family type distribution, all percentages refer to the proportion of people in each group who reported the specific state or behaviour.

---PDF BREAK---

Education

  • Personal income and adequacy of income to meet everyday needs were both higher for people with higher levels of qualifications.
  • People with no educational qualifications were around twice as likely as people with qualifications to report fair or poor health.
  • The likelihood of people having undertaken voluntary work tended to rise along with their level of qualification.
  • People with higher qualifications were generally more likely to live in households that recycled more.
  • People with a qualification were slightly more satisfied with life overall than those without.

In the last 30 years, demand for skills increased within the labour market. Successive generations have spent longer periods of time in education gaining more formal qualifications.

Excluding those aged 15–20 years, for whom large numbers are still participating in study, young adults were more likely to have qualifications, and to have higher levels of qualifications, than older people. Therefore, findings associated with education in the NZGSS have strong links to the age-related patterns described earlier. ---PDF BREAK---

Selected NZGSS Measures
By level of education
Measure No qualification Level 1–4 certificate Level 5–6 diploma Level 7 / bachelor's degree and above
Percent
Distribution 22.7 43.3 13.7 20.3
Do not have enough money to meet everyday needs(1) 20.3 15.0 11.9 8.4
Fair / poor health 22.4 9.8 11.5 7.9
Have a major problem with house / neighbourhood 47.8 51.5 53.1 57.4
Very safe / safe walking alone in neighbourhood at night 48.8 53.9 52.0 56.7
Household has stored emergency water 40.8 40.5 42.1 38.5
Experienced discrimination in the last 12 months 9.0 9.2 10.6 13.1
Had face-to-face contact with family(2) 87.5 88.6 82.7 74.4
Felt isolated from others most / all of time in last four weeks 4.1 3.7 2.1* 3.4
Undertook voluntary work(3) 25.9 29.8 37.7 41.8
Household recycles all / most recyclable items 68.9 70.6 77.3 81.3
Very satisfied / satisfied with life overall 80.6 86.1 87.3 89.9
(1) Only asked of people aged 18 years and over, and includes partner's income where applicable.
(2) Living in another household during the past four weeks.
(3) For a group or organisation in the last four weeks.
* Relative sampling error is greater than 50 percent.
Note: Respondents with an overseas secondary school qualification were not included in the population of analysis. Apart from the level of education distribution, all percentages refer to the proportion of people in each group who reported the specific state or behaviour.
---PDF BREAK---

Labour force status

  • Nearly half of the unemployed said their income was not enough to meet everyday needs, and this rate was four times higher than for employed people and almost three times higher than for people not in the labour force.
  • Unemployed people were more likely to report major housing or neighbourhood problems (66 percent) than people who were employed (53 percent) or not in the labour force (46 percent).
  • Regardless of labour force status, people had similar patterns of contact with non-resident family and friends, and had someone outside their household to ask for support in times of crisis.
  • People who were employed or not in the labour force were less likely to report feeling socially isolated than those who were unemployed – 67 percent of employed people and 68 percent of those out of the labour force never felt isolated from the people around them compared with only 56 percent of unemployed people.
  • Unemployed people were two-to-three times more likely than people who were employed or not in the labour force to say they were dissatisfied or very dissatisfied with life overall.

The NZGSS began at a time of very low unemployment – the non-seasonally adjusted unemployment rate measured by the Household Labour Force Survey was 3.9 percent in the June 2008 quarter. However, this had risen to 5.6 percent in the March 2009 quarter when the NZGSS was completed. The unemployment rate for the NZGSS, an average for the year, was 4.2 percent.

Across all the reported population groups, unemployed people showed one of the highest rates of income inadequacy, and one of the lowest levels of overall life satisfaction.

Graph, Overall life satisfaction, by labour force status. ---PDF BREAK---

Selected NZGSS Measures
By labour force status
Measure Employed Unemployed Not in the labour force
Percent
Distribution 68.9 3.0(1) 28.1
Do not have enough money to meet everyday needs(2) 12.1 48.7 17.7
Fair / poor health 8.7 14.1 21.7
Have a major problem with house / neighbourhood 52.9 66.2 45.5
Very safe / safe walking alone in neighbourhood at night 56.0 50.4 42.9
Household has stored emergency water 39.2 40.8 44.6
Experienced discrimination in the last 12 months 10.4 19.2 8.6
Had face-to-face contact with family(3) 84.0 84.4 83.0
Felt isolated from others most / all of time in last four weeks 3.1 8.3* 4.4
Undertook voluntary work(4) 32.7 28.7 32.9
Household recycles all / most recyclable items 73.1 72.5 76.1
Very satisfied / satisfied with life overall 86.7 67.4 85.6
(1) Refers to the percentage of people aged 15 years and over in the total population who were unemployed, whereas the unemployment rate given in the text was calculated from the labour force population, ie those in paid work and those actively seeking work.
(2) Only asked of people aged 18 years and over, and includes partner's income where applicable.
(3) Living in another household during the past four weeks.
(4) For a group or organisation in the last four weeks.
* Relative sampling error is greater than 50 percent.
Note: Apart from the labour force status distribution, all percentages refer to the proportion of people in each group who reported the specific state or behaviour.

Household income

  • One-quarter of people with an annual household income of $30,000 or less reported having fair or poor health, and this proportion was three times higher than for people with an annual household income of $100,001 or more.
  • People with an annual household income of $30,000 or less were one-and-a-half times more likely to feel unsafe or very unsafe walking alone in the neighbourhood at night than people with an annual household income of $100,001 or more.
  • While about three-quarters (78 percent) of people with an annual household income of $30,000 or less were very satisfied or satisfied with life overall, they were less likely to be satisfied than people with higher household incomes.

Those with an annual household income of $30,000 or less include a range of young and old people, including: retired people, beneficiaries, and young people not working or in part-time work while studying. Lower household incomes are usually single person or single-income households. Households with higher annual incomes are more likely to include people in the working-age groups.

Selected NZGSS Measures
By household income
Measure $30,000 or less $30,001–$70,000 $70,001–$100,000 $100,001 or more
Percent
Distribution 14.3 32.2 19.6 33.9
Do not have enough money to meet everyday needs(1) 26.0 16.8 13.9 7.7
Fair / poor health 24.6 13.8 10.2 7.5
Have a major problem with house / neighbourhood 51.2 54.2 54.0 46.8
Very safe / safe walking alone in neighbourhood at night 42.8 50.1 51.7 58.5
Household has stored emergency water 41.4 41.5 41.4 39.4
Experienced discrimination in the last 12 months 10.2 10.1 10.4 9.9
Had face-to-face contact with family(2) 82.5 83.5 85.6 83.3
Felt isolated from others most / all of time in last four weeks 5.0 4.1 4.4 2.2
Undertook voluntary work(3) 29.0 31.9 32.6 34.8
Household recycles all / most recyclable items 73.2 71.8 74.2 76.0
Very satisfied / satisfied with life overall 78.2 84.7 87.1 89.4
(1) Only asked of people aged 18 years and over, and includes partner's income where applicable.
(2) Living in another household during the past four weeks.
(3) For a group or organisation in the last four weeks.
Note: Apart from the income distribution, all percentages refer to the proportion of people in each group who reported the specific state or behaviour.

Note: A table of selected NZGSS measures by personal income is included in the ‘Tables’ section.


Tenure

  • People who lived in rented dwellings were more than twice as likely as people who lived in owner-occupied dwellings to report that they did not have enough money to meet everyday needs.
  • About two-thirds of people in rented dwellings had a major housing or neighbourhood problem, compared with less than half of people who lived in owner-occupied dwellings.
  • People in owner-occupied dwellings were around one-and-a-half times more likely to have emergency water than people in rented dwellings.
  • People in rented dwellings were twice as likely to report that they had experienced discrimination in the past 12 months as people in owner-occupied dwellings.
  • Social connections were stronger for those in owner-occupied compared with rented dwellings – these connections include greater access to support in a time of crisis from someone in another household, greater satisfaction with the amount of contact with non-resident family and friends, and lower levels of feeling isolated from others.
  • People in rented dwellings reported slightly lower overall life satisfaction than those in owner-occupied dwellings.

Across all the reported population groups, people in rented dwellings reported one of the highest rates of housing or neighbourhood problems, and one of the lowest rates of emergency water storage.

Although people in owner-occupied dwellings as a whole were more satisfied with life overall than people in rented dwellings, people in rented dwellings with a household income of $70,001 or more had similar levels of overall life satisfaction to people in owner-occupied dwellings. ---PDF BREAK---

Selected NZGSS Measures
By tenure
Measure Owner-occupied(1) Rented
Percent
Distribution 71.2 28.8
Do not have enough money to meet everyday needs(2) 10.3 24.9
Fair / poor health 11.4 15.3
Have a major problem with house / neighbourhood 45.1 66.4
Very safe / safe walking alone in neighbourhood at night 53.0 51.1
Household has stored emergency water 44.6 31.2
Experienced discrimination in the last 12 months 7.8 15.7
Had face-to-face contact with family(3) 85.6 79.1
Felt isolated from others most / all of time in last four weeks 2.3 6.9
Undertook voluntary work(4) 34.9 27.1
Household recycles all / most recyclable items 75.1 71.1
Very satisfied / satisfied with life overall 88.4 79.4
(1) Owner-occupied dwellings include dwellings owned or partly-owned (with or without a mortgage), and dwellings held in a family trust.
(2) Only asked of people aged 18 years and over, and includes partner's income where applicable.
(3) Living in another household during the past four weeks.
(4) For a group or organisation in the last four weeks.
Note: Apart from the tenure distribution, all percentages refer to the proportion of people in each group who reported the specific state or behaviour.

Region

  • The Auckland and Wellington regions had the highest proportions of people with an annual personal income of $70,001 or more (around 16 percent each) compared with other regions.
  • People living in the Auckland region were one-and-a-half times more likely than those in the Wellington region to report that they had inadequate income to meet their everyday needs.
  • Across the regions, there was not much difference in reporting of major housing or neighbourhood problems.
  • Distinct regional differences showed in feelings of safety when walking alone in the neighbourhood at night – for example, people in the Auckland region felt less safe than people in the Wellington or Rest of the South Island regions.
  • People in the Auckland and Canterbury regions were the most likely to live in a household that recycled all or most of those things they knew could be recycled.
  • Across the regions, people reported very similar levels of overall life satisfaction.

The regional breakdowns presented in this report are based on regional council areas, and grouped where necessary for analysis (for example, Northland / Bay of Plenty / Gisborne).

The difference between the Auckland and Wellington regions in having ‘enough money to meet everyday needs’ may reflect a higher cost of living in some areas of Auckland, particularly in housing and rental costs. ---PDF BREAK---

Graph, People who felt unsafe / very unsafe walking alone in their neighbourhood at night, by region.

Graph, People who lived in households that had stored emergency water, by region. ---PDF BREAK---

Selected NZGSS Measures
by region
Measure

Auck
-
land

Welling
-ton
Northland / Bay of Plenty / Gisborne Rest of North Island Canter
-bury
Rest of South Island
Percent
Distribution 33.2 11.2 10.8 20.5 13.2 11.0
Do not have enough money to meet everyday needs(1) 17.5 10.7 14.4 13.7 13.4 12.7
Fair / poor health 10.9 10.7 13.8 13.7 13.1 15.0
Have a major problem with house / neighbourhood 51.5 50.5 53.2 51.7 49.5 50.2
Very safe / safe walking alone in neighbourhood at night 48.0 57.2 52.7 49.7 52.5 65.7
Household has stored emergency water 33.9 51.3 43.2 49.3 33.8 40.4
Experienced discrimination in the last 12 months 11.3 8.9 11.5 10.5 8.7 7.3
Had face-to-face contact with family(2) 80.3 82.0 84.3 89.5 84.9 83.1
Felt isolated from others most / all of time in last four weeks 3.3 2.9 4.3 3.8 3.5 4.5
Undertook voluntary work(3) 30.6 31.6 32.0 34.4 31.4 38.6
Household recycles all / most recyclable items 84.7 70.2 73.2 64.5 83.1 52.7
Very satisfied / satisfied with life overall 86.2 86.5 83.2 86.4 86.6 84.7
(1) Only asked of people aged 18 years and over, and includes partner's income where applicable.
(2) Living in another household during the past four weeks.
(3) For a group or organisation in the last four weeks.
Note: Apart from the regional distribution, all percentages refer to the proportion of people in each group who reported the specific state or behaviour.


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For technical information contact:
Deborah Potter
Wellington 04 931 4600
Email: info@stats.govt.nz

Next release…
Further results will be published as they become available.

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