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Crime victimisation patterns in New Zealand

Crime Victimisation Patterns in New Zealand compares victimisation statistics produced from the New Zealand Crime and Safety Survey 2006 (NZCASS) and the New Zealand General Social Survey 2008 (GSS) to see if the socio-demographic characteristics of victims in the surveys are similar.

The report looks at victimisation prevalence and repeat victimisation in relation to the total population, and to certain population groups, such as age, sex, ethnicity, household tenure, and the New Zealand index of deprivation 2001 groups.

Users of crime victimisation data will see how the GSS module on safety and security compares with New Zealand’s primary victimisation survey, the NZCSS.

The GSS is a two-yearly, multi-topic survey of individual well-being. The GSS allows the interrelationships between crime victimisation and other areas of society (such as knowledge and skills, paid work, economic standard of living, physical environment, and social connectedness) to be looked at.

The NZCASS is designed to collect crime and safety information from individuals in selected households. This enables investigation across crime topics, populations, regions, and time.

Geoff Bascand
Government Statistician

Citation
Statistics New Zealand (2010). Crime Victimisation Patterns in New Zealand: New Zealand General Social Survey 2008 and New Zealand Crime and Safety Survey 2006 compared
Wellington: Statistics New Zealand

Published in October 2010

ISBN 978-0-478-35308-2 (online)

For media enquiries contact: 
Anne Hannah 
Wellington 04 931 4600
Email: info@stats.govt.nz

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