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Indicator 11: dwelling type

Discussion

New Zealanders traditionally lived in separate or detached houses on large plots of land – the iconic quarter-acre section. As the population grows and lifestyles change, however, the suitability of this type of dwelling is diminishing. In the larger cities particularly, urban sprawl is placing strain on land supply and infrastructure, and local authorities are planning a more intensified approach to residential development. This, together with an increase in the number of people living in rented dwellings (see indicator 14), is resulting in changes to the types of dwellings most New Zealanders live in.

Of all territorial authorities in 2006, Auckland City had the lowest proportion of households resident in separate houses (62.5 percent). Southland District had the highest at 95.8 percent while Nelson City (81.5 percent) was closer to the New Zealand average of 81.4 percent.

Graph, Percentage of Housholds Living in Separate/Detached Houses.

Tables

20.0 Percentage of households usually resident in each dwelling type for households in private occupied dwellings 1996, 2001, 2006
20.3 Percentage of households usually resident in each dwelling type by tenure of household for households in private occupied dwellings, 1996, 2001, 2006

Specifications

  • Data source: Statistics New Zealand, Census of Population and Dwellings
  • Frequency: five yearly (available from 1996 onwards)
  • Geographic level of data availability: New Zealand, regional council, territorial authority and urban area. Data may be available down to area unit level subject to confidentiality.
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