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Introduction to Te Kupenga

Te Kupenga is a survey of the well-being of Māori living in New Zealand.

Te Kupenga focuses on key aspects of Māori culture and society from a Māori perspective. It tries to measure these aspects using quantitative methods. In this respect, the survey is informed by a Māori-centred approach.

The survey includes standard well-being measures found in surveys like the General Social Survey, such as employment, income, and overall life satisfaction. It measures objective information about people’s circumstances, as well as their assessment of different aspects of their lives. For more about what’s included in Te Kupenga, see appendix 1.

Information from Te Kupenga will allow policymakers to better understand Māori well-being and development. The government has invested significantly in areas such as health, education, and welfare services; Māori cultural education; and settling Treaty grievances. Measuring how Māori are doing in these areas will allow the government to see how their investments are working.

Te Kupenga will also help Māori plan how to best allocate resources to improve community well-being and strengthen Māori culture. Key Māori stakeholders want more information about Māori culture and well-being, which they believe are directly connected. These stakeholders include iwi that have settled Treaty grievances with the Crown and are now developing plans to strengthen their membership. They need good information to help them plan.

The target population for Te Kupenga is New Zealand residents aged 15 years and over with Māori heritage. By Māori heritage, we mean those who report in the 2013 Census of Population and Dwellings form that they have Māori ethnicity or Māori ancestry.

We will collect data for Te Kupenga over a two-month period, from June 2013 to July 2013. We will select a nationally representative sample of 5,000 people and collect information through computer-assisted personal interviews.

Field test for Te Kupenga

We ran a field test for Te Kupenga in November 2010. We wanted to make sure the data collection process – including questionnaires, collection systems, and interviewer training – worked as an integrated system. We interviewed 200 people who had been randomly selected from the 2010 Census dress rehearsal. The interviews were done by 11 interviewers in four regions (Gisborne, Northland, South Auckland, and Wellington).

The field test sample was not designed to provide robust statistical estimates about the population – that is the purpose of the 2013 survey. We are presenting the results of the field test to support thinking and discussion about how the results of the 2013 survey might be presented and used. They do not represent or preview the results of the survey.

The field test was not representative of the target population. It included a:

  • higher proportion of females
  • lower proportion of youth (15–24 years)
  • lower proportion of people with no formal qualifications.
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