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Purpose and summary

Purpose

Kei te pēwhea tō whānau? Exploring whānau using the Māori Social Survey describes how the Māori Social Survey 2013 (Te Kupenga) will study whānau and whānau well-being.

This report explains the Māori-centred approach that Te Kupenga takes to understanding whānau and whānau well-being. We also provide a preview of this relatively new approach by presenting data on whānau and whānau well-being from the Te Kupenga field test. The field test results are illustrative only and should not be treated as official statistics.

We hope to generate discussion among researchers. Feedback to Statistics NZ is welcome and should be directed to Atawhai Tibble at social.cultural.statistics@stats.govt.nz.

Summary of key points

  • Te Kupenga will be run in June 2013 to collect well-being information from Māori living in New Zealand.
  • Te Kupenga examines key aspects of Māori culture and society using quantitative methods. The survey is informed by a Māori-centred approach, which emphasises the need to see the world through Māori eyes.
  • Whānau are complex and diverse, and individuals describe their whānau in different ways. Te Kupenga lets individual Māori identify their whānau for themselves.
  • Taking the view that whānau well-being is best defined by individuals, Te Kupenga asks Māori how well their whānau is doing.
  • Limited field test data shows interesting findings about whānau and whānau well-being, including:
    • Whānau are big. The median size (half above this value and half below) of whānau in the field test was 12. The range in the field test was 1 to 500.
    • All respondents in the field test considered whakapapa to be an important part of whānau. No one had whānau that was solely made up of people they weren’t related to by blood.
    • Older respondents reported larger whānau than younger and middle-aged respondents.
    • Most respondents thought their whānau was doing well.
    • Middle-aged respondents rated their whānau is doing better, on average, than did younger and older respondents.
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