Stats NZ has a new website.

For new releases go to

www.stats.govt.nz

As we transition to our new site, you'll still find some Stats NZ information here on this archive site.

  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+
Business and labour statistics for Māori authorities

Characteristics of Māori authorities

Māori authorities were initially created to administer communally-owned Māori land. Over time, some Māori authorities have grown to include post-treaty settlement interests. This expansion has seen Māori authorities evolve beyond traditional land-based industries towards greater development and investment opportunities for Māori.

At February 2014, 68 percent of Māori authorities were engaged in the rental, hiring, and real estate services (41 percent), and agriculture, forestry, and fishing industries (27 percent). The proportions of Māori businesses in these industries were higher than the proportions of all businesses in New Zealand.

Māori connection to the land and sea is evident in these traditional land-based industries. Businesses in the rental, hiring, and real estate industry largely reflect that they rent or lease agriculture and other commercial property to others, while the agriculture, forestry, and fishing industry reflects the intensive use of land.

Māori authorities were also represented in industries outside the traditional land-based industries. Most notably in financial and insurance services (9.6 percent).

Note: Macrons (eg ā) are not available within our graphing software so do not appear in the figures that follow.

Figure 1

 

The regional distribution of businesses owned by Māori authorities reflects the distribution of their assets throughout New Zealand – iwi are concentrated in the central North Island more than in the South Island. At February 2014, 89 percent of Māori authorities were located in the North Island, particularly in the rural areas of Bay of Plenty (27 percent of the total) and Waikato (21 percent).

Figure 2

The number of filled jobs in Māori authorities reached 8,300 in 2014. The distribution of these jobs differs from total New Zealand businesses due to the nature and location of Māori authority assets.

On an industry basis, the largest proportion of filled jobs in Māori authorities in 2014 was in the traditional agriculture, forestry, and fishing industry (19 percent). However, large proportions of jobs were also in the less traditional industries of education and training (18 percent), and health care and social assistance (16 percent), reflecting a focus on cultural and social well-being.

Figure 3

Despite the predominance of Māori authorities in the rural North Island, filled jobs were concentrated in the South Island and Waikato in 2014. The largest increase in filled jobs was in the South Island, up 11 percent from 2013.

Figure 4

 

 

  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+
Top
  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+