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Business activities of Māori authorities

Māori authorities report entering new export markets

A small proportion of both Māori authorities (10 percent), and all New Zealand businesses (6 percent) with six or more employees, that were surveyed, reported they had entered new export markets in 2013.

This was reflected in the increase in trading partners in 2014, up from 62 to 66 countries. Māori authorities traded with 58 export partner countries in 2014, up from 54 in 2013, and 36 import partner countries – up from 32.

China was the top export partner, receiving 44 percent of the total value of goods exported by Māori authorities in 2014, and 47 percent in 2013. Other top export partners were Australia and the United States.

This growth and diversification into new export markets comes not only from a strong, responsibly-managed asset base but also from investing in business and cultural relationships in external markets. Products and services produced from the Māori asset base for export are associated with Māori branding, providing a point of difference in global markets.

Kaimoana leads increase in exports

Despite the challenges currently faced by New Zealand businesses in global markets, goods exported by Māori authorities increased in 2014. They were worth $526 million in 2014, up $16 million (3.1 percent) from 2013.

Kaimoana (seafood) was the top export commodity in 2014, making up over 50 percent of total exports by Māori authorities. Kaimoana exported by Māori authorities made up 21 percent of New Zealand’s total kaimoana exports in 2014. Māori authorities’ top three export commodities (kaimoana, dairy, and meat and fish preparations) made up over 90 percent of the total value of exports by Māori authorities in 2014. Meat and fish preparations involve a higher level of value-added processing of agricultural and seafood products.

Imports fall slightly in 2014

Māori authorities imported $47 million of goods in 2014, down slightly (0.3 percent) from 2013. The top three import commodities (meat and fish preparations, sugars and sugar confectionary, and seafood) made up 81 percent of the total value of imports by Māori authorities in 2014. Thailand and the United States were their top import partners.

Figure 9

Research and development varies by purpose

Growth in the productive and internationally-connected export sector requires continuous innovation. Research and development (R&D) is an indicator of the amount of innovation in an economy. The total spend on R&D by Māori authorities in 2013 was $2.6 million. When this expenditure is broken down by its purpose, almost half was spent on industrial research, slightly less than one-third on R&D related to primary industries, and almost one-quarter on R&D for the purposes of social purposes.

The Māori authorities with six or more employees, and that responded to the survey, reported business planning practices that were similar to those for all New Zealand businesses surveyed in 2013.

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