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New statistics on Māori economic activity

We have continued our work towards expanding our coverage of the Māori economy. This section does not use our definition of a Māori authority and therefore is separate from the previous results in chapters 2 to 4.

We have developed Māori tourism statistics after gaining help from our partners to identify Māori tourism businesses. Further, we have used existing data sources to create statistics on the contribution of Māori employees through wages they are paid.

New Zealand Māori tourism

The Māori tourism business information below was made possible after New Zealand Māori Tourism shared its member list with us. Although we could not identify all their businesses on our Business Register, this information is a good example of what can be provided from existing information.

The New Zealand Māori tourism operators we identified had goods and services (GST) sales of $214 million for the year ended February 2015. Operators who were accommodation providers had GST sales of $73 million for this period, and in the February 2015 month provided 46,000 guest nights of accommodation. The national total was 3.7 million guest nights for the February month.

The highest proportion of Māori tourism businesses was in the arts and recreation services industry (31 percent). This industry includes cultural performance and tour providers, art galleries, and scenic tour and adventure tourism companies. Māori tourism businesses were also found in the accommodation and food services (19 percent), retail trade (11 percent), and administrative and support services (11 percent) industries.

Figure 10

Two-thirds of all Māori tourism employees were located in either the Bay of Plenty (43 percent) or South Island (24 percent) in February 2015. The regional distribution of employees reflected the distribution of Māori tourism businesses.

Figure 11

Contribution of Māori employees through wages they are paid

As part of our review of the relative importance of industries and occupations in the labour cost index (LCI), we also estimated the contribution that Māori paid employees make across industries and occupations, based on the wages they receive.

This contribution is based on over 200,000 jobs filled by Māori employees who are paid, complementing information about employees in Māori authorities – which covers 8,300 jobs filled by Māori and non-Māori.

[Note: on 23 June 2015 we corrected the 8,300 figure above from the 8,200 we originally published.]

Figure 12

 

Looking across industries, the industries that are most important for Māori, based on the proportions of wages they are paid, are:

  • Education and training – many Māori are employed in Māori immersion schools such as te kohanga reo for pre-school education, and te kura kaupapa Māori for primary education.
  • Health care and social assistance – many Māori are employed in providing health care and support services in homes and aged-care facilities.
  • Construction – many Māori are employed in building and maintaining infrastructure, such as roads and bridges.
  • Central government administration, defence, and public safety – many Māori are employed in government departments (including social and welfare workers, and prison and probation officers) and the armed forces.
  • Food, beverage, and tobacco product manufacturing – many Māori are employed in manufacturing meat and meat products.

Overall, $11 of every $100 of total wages paid by employers is paid to Māori employees. The industries in which the relative proportions of Māori, based on the wages they are paid, are highest are:

  • Forestry and logging – about $40 of every $100 is paid to Māori employees.
  • Fishing, aquaculture, and agriculture, forestry, and fishing support services – about $25 of every $100 is paid to Māori employees.
  • Wood and paper products manufacturing – about $20 of every $100 is paid to Māori employees.
  • Food, beverage, and tobacco product manufacturing – about $20 of every $100 is paid to Māori employees.

Figure 13

Looking across occupations, the occupations that are most important for Māori, based on the proportions of wages they are paid, are:

  • Professionals – many are employed as teachers (some being kaiako kohanga reo – Māori language nest teachers), and social and welfare workers.
  • Labourers – many are employed as commercial cleaners and construction labourers.
  • Managers – many are employed as corporate general managers in health care and social assistance services, and as retail managers in supermarkets, grocery stores, clothing retailing, and department stores.

Within each occupation group, the greatest contributions from Māori, based on the total wages they are paid, are:

  • Labourers – about $20 of every $100 paid to labourers is paid to Māori employees.
  • Machinery operators and drivers – about $20 of every $100 is paid to Māori employees.
  • Community and personal service workers – about $15 of every $100 is paid to Māori employees.




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