Stats NZ has a new website.

For new releases go to

www.stats.govt.nz

As we transition to our new site, you'll still find some Stats NZ information here on this archive site.

  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+
Call of the marae still strong – media release

Tirohia tēnei whārangi i te reo Māori

Nearly 400,000 Māori know which of the country’s 800-plus marae is theirs, and most would like to visit more often, according to the first report of its kind from Statistics New Zealand.

Taku marae e: Connecting to ancestral marae 2013 showed that 71 percent of Māori know their ancestral marae, and nearly half of those have visited in the past year.

“One of the really interesting things we found is that Māori who visit their marae are also more likely to be engaged in other aspects of Māori culture,” households statistics manager Diane Ramsay said.

“For instance, Māori who can speak te reo, or who know all their pepeha or tribal identity, are more likely to visit their marae than others.”

The report highlighted a strong link between tūrangawaewae (place to stand and belong) and visiting marae. Over half of Māori adults reported they had an ancestral marae that they thought of as their tūrangawaewae, and almost all of them had been to their marae at some point in their lives.

The report also showed that Māori want to visit their marae more, especially those who have never been there. Of Māori who knew their ancestral marae but had never been there, 68 percent said they would’ve liked to have visited in the last 12 months.

“This valuable report showed that connection to marae is an important aspect of Māori culture and identity,” Ms Ramsay said.

Taku marae e: Connecting to ancestral marae 2013 uses information from the Te Kupenga 2013 survey of Māori well-being.

See Te Kupenga for more results.

Ends

For media enquiries contact: Colin Marshall, Wellington 04 931 4600, email: info@stats.govt.nz  
Authorised by Liz MacPherson, Government Statistician, 15 December 2014

  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+
Top
  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+