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Purpose and summary

Tirohia tēnei whārangi i te reo Māori

Nau mai haere mai ki Taku marae e: Connecting to ancestral marae 2013.

Hokia ki ngā maunga, kia purea nei koe e ngā hau o Tāwhirimātea

Return to the mountains to be refreshed by the winds of Tāwhirimātea.

This whakatauki (proverb) urges Māori to connect to their culture to be restored and refreshed within tikanga Māori. Visiting and connecting to their ancestral marae is one way Māori can do this.

Purpose

Taku marae e: Connecting to ancestral marae 2013 uses information from the Te Kupenga 2013 survey of Māori well-being to look at the social, cultural, and economic characteristics of Māori (aged 15 years or older) that are associated with their connecting to ancestral marae.

Specifically, it looks at the characteristics of Māori who:

  • visit any of their ancestral marae
  • have been there in the 12 months before the survey, and the number of times they had done so in that period
  • wanted to have gone or done so more often in that 12-month period.

Summary

Most Māori know their ancestral marae, connect to it through visiting, and want to go more often. Te Kupenga results showed more than half (62 percent) had been to their ancestral marae at some time in their lives and around one-third (34 percent) had done so in the 12 months before the survey was undertaken. Of Māori who knew their ancestral marae, 59 percent wanted to have gone there or done so more often.

Other aspects of Māori identity and culture are strongly linked with Māori connecting to ancestral marae. Māori with te reo Māori as their first language, with greater ability to speak te reo, who know all their pepeha (tribal identity), and with an ancestral marae they consider their tūrangawaewae, are more likely to visit their ancestral marae than others. For example, nearly all (94 percent) of the 282,000 Māori with an ancestral marae as their tūrangawaewae had been to their ancestral marae at some point in their life and 57 percent had been in the last 12 months.

Age is closely linked to ancestral marae connection. In that older Māori are more likely than younger Māori to have been to their ancestral marae, to have done so recently, and to have visited more often. Of those aged 55 years or older, 45 percent had been to their ancestral marae six or more times in the last 12 months, compared with 23 percent of 15–24-year-olds.

Visiting their ancestral marae is an important and relevant way for Māori to connect with their culture. The marae continues to be a vital aspect of Māori culture and identity.

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