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Topics included in Te Kupenga 2013
 Te Kupenga means fishing net. The late Pumi Taituha (Tainui) likened the gathering of statistics to the gathering of fish using a kupenga. The name Te Kupenga likens the survey to a net. The data and the knowledge is korero or food. The kai sustains and feeds the people so that they may live well. Good data and knowledge also sustains and feeds the people so that they may live well.
   
Tirohia tēnei whārangi i te reo Māori 
 

See a summary of the topics that will be covered in Te Kupenga 2013.

They are grouped by four aspects of well-being:

Subjective well-being

Questions about subjective well-being cover:

  • overall life satisfaction
  • sense of control over one's life
  • self-assessed health status
  • sense of connection to tūrangawaewae
  • sense of how one's whānau is doing
  • sense of whānau progress over the past 12 months
 Image showing how the four well-being aspects relate to each other.

Social well-being

Questions about social well-being cover:

  • type and regularity of whānau contact
  • satisfaction with whānau contact
  • ability to access help in a time of crisis
  • involvement in any voluntary work
  • experience of loneliness in the past 12 months
  • trust in others
  • trust in government and government institutions
  • participation in the last national and local government elections
  • experience of crime in past 12 months
  • experience of discrimination ever and in past 12 months

Cultural well-being

Questions about cultural well-being cover:

  • knowledge of iwi, enrolled with iwi, and participated in last iwi elections
  • knowledge of pepehā, marae tūpuna, and if ever visited a marae, and if in past 12 months
  • ability to access Māori cultural support in time of need
  • engagement in general practices related to Māori culture over the past 12 months
  • being religious and/or spiritual
  • Māori language ability
  • where and with whom te reo Māori is spoken
  • whether or not a native speaker

Economic well-being

Questions about economic well-being cover:

  • material standard of living
  • paid work
  • housing problems

See also

Published 14 November 2012

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