Stats NZ has a new website.

For new releases go to

www.stats.govt.nz

As we transition to our new site, you'll still find some Stats NZ information here on this archive site.

  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+

This report uses New Zealand General Social Survey (NZGSS) information to explore patterns of loneliness in adults aged 15 years and older in New Zealand. This report discusses:

  • the prevalence of loneliness among the adult population
  • the relationship between loneliness and a range of key risk factors
  • the relationship with age for each risk factor

Read the report online or download and print the PDF from ‘Available files’ above. If you have problems viewing the files, see opening files and PDFs.

Summary of key findings

Prevalence of loneliness in New Zealand

  • In 2010, one in three (1.02 million) adult New Zealanders felt lonely to some degree in the last four weeks.
  • This includes 21,700 people (0.7 percent) who felt lonely all of the time, 94,500 (3.0 percent) most of the time, and 374,000 (12 percent) some of the time.
  • 18 percent of young adults felt lonely all, most, or some of the time, compared with 11 percent of older people.

Factors associated with loneliness

  • Overall, young adults had a greater likelihood of feeling lonely.
  • The chances of feeling lonely decreased linearly with age, so that older people were the least likely to feel lonely.
  • There was a strong relationship between loneliness and poor mental health that was consistent across all ages.

Factors differ by stage of life

  • There was a strong relationship between a person’s economic standard of living and their feelings of loneliness. This association increased for older people.
  • Being a recent migrant was associated with loneliness only for people in midlife.
  • Young people and people in midlife were more likely to feel lonely when they lived alone. Older people were less likely to feel lonely when they live in a two-person household than other household sizes, including large households.
  • Younger and older women were more likely to feel lonely than their male counterparts.

ISBN 978-0-478-40826-3 (online)
Published 23 April 2013

  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+
Top
  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+