Stats NZ has a new website.

For new releases go to

www.stats.govt.nz

As we transition to our new site, you'll still find some Stats NZ information here on this archive site.

  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+
Birthplace

Over time the Pacific population has changed from a mainly migrant group to a largely New Zealand-born population. As figure 1.3 shows, the majority of Pacific people now living in New Zealand were born here, with the proportion increasing from 49 percent to 60 percent between 1986 and 2006.

Figure 1.3

Graph, Proportion of Pacific people born in NZ

The groups with the highest proportions born in New Zealand are those who have always had unrestricted rights of settlement and therefore have had more opportunity to become established. These are namely Cook Islands people and Niueans (of whom 73 percent and 74 percent are born in New Zealand, respectively), as well as Tokelauans (69 percent). The greatest increases in the proportion of New Zealand-born people have been amongst these three groups. Fijians are the only group in which the majority were born overseas, reflecting a historical pattern of temporary labour migration rather than permanent settlement and an increase in migration following the coups of the late 1980s.

Figure 1.4 shows how long ago overseas-born Pacific people migrated to New Zealand. For the Pacific group as a whole, 40 percent have lived in New Zealand for 20 or more years.

Figure 1.4

Graph, Length of time since migration

Within this group, those who are most likely to have lived in New Zealand for this length of time are Niueans (71 percent), Cook Islands people (62 percent), and Tokelauans (54 percent). The median duration of residence is 29 years for Niueans, 27 years for Cook Islands people, 23 years for Tokelauans, 18 years for Samoans, 13 years for Tongans, and nine years for Fijians.

  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+
Top
  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+