Stats NZ has a new website.

For new releases go to

www.stats.govt.nz

As we transition to our new site, you'll still find some Stats NZ information here on this archive site.

  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+
Introduction

Success in education is fundamental to the well-being of people, their families and communities, and New Zealand as a whole. At the national level, a more highly-educated workforce boosts productivity and economic well-being (Foley, 2005). At the community level, people’s physical, mental, and emotional well-being, as well as their income, are all better at higher education levels. In addition, children's longer-term educational outcomes are influenced more by their parents’ education and income levels than by their gender or ethnicity.

There are many factors involved in educational success. To achieve well in higher education, people need to do well at school. To do well at school, students need strong literacy and numeracy skills, as well as the ability to use these well. Children need to enter school with the skills, knowledge, and attitudes necessary for successful learning. Parents, families, communities, and teachers all have a critical role in ensuring children’s educational success.

The Pacific population living in New Zealand is young, particularly those born in New Zealand (Callister & Didham, 2008). By 2051, New Zealand’s student population will rise from the current one in ten Pacific learners, to one in five of the total school population (Ferguson et al., 2008). Those learners will represent a wide variety of Pacific nations and communities. The implications for education services are huge.

Despite some improvements in educational outcomes, Pacific communities still have the highest proportion of people with no qualifications. It is generally accepted that this puts them at a serious disadvantage. Figure 1 shows the percentage of Pacific peoples with no qualifications, using data from the 2006 Census. Interestingly, Pacific females in general are less likely to have ‘no qualification’ compared with Pacific males. Fijians were more likely to have qualifications than the total New Zealand population.

Figure 1

Graph, Pacific peoples with no qualification: by ethnic group and sex.

The Ministry of Education has developed a Pasifika Education Plan 2009–2012 (PEP) to focus activity on what will make the most difference for improving education outcomes for Pacific students. The vision expressed in the revised PEP is that:

“The education system must work for Pasifika so they gain the knowledge and skills necessary to do well for themselves, their communities, New Zealand, the Pacific region and the world.”

The plan seeks to achieve this vision by focusing actions on areas with high Pacific populations as well as identifying what will make the most difference for Pacific students:

  • building strong learning foundations 
  • lifting literacy and numeracy achievement by using national standards to improve teaching and plain language reporting to parents 
  • increasing the number of students achieving and leaving school with qualifications.

The PEP also sets aspirational but realistic targets to monitor the government’s success. These targets are monitored and reported on in the annual Pasifika Education Plan Monitoring Report.

Education and Pacific Peoples in New Zealand looks at the most important factors for educational success, as well as what is actually happening in education for Pacific peoples.

  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+
Top
  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+