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As we transition to our new site, you'll still find some Stats NZ information here on this archive site.

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Time Use Survey – information releases

The Time Use Survey 2009/10 (TUS) presents information on the way New Zealanders aged 12 years and over used their time in 2009/10. The survey was designed to allow comparisons with the first national TUS, run in 1998/99.

How people use their time is determined by the prevailing social and economic environment, cultural values, personal circumstances, and the expression of individual preference. Time-use statistics provide a unique perspective of people’s behaviour, standard of living, social roles, work-life balance, and social well-being, which is not readily apparent in conventional social and economic statistics.

Latest release

The latest release contains tables on:

  • time spent on primary activities, 1998/99 and 2009/10
  • time spent on activity groups, by life stage, ethnicity, family role, and labour force status, 1998/99 and 2009/10
  • time spent on paid and unpaid work activities, 1998/99 and 2009/10
  • who unpaid work was performed for, 1998/99 and 2009/10
  • time spent on primary and simultaneous activities, 1998/99 and 2009/10
  • time spent alone and with others, 2009/10
  • daily participation rates and time spent by participants, 2009/10
  • time spent by participants on activity groups, by life stage, ethnicity, family role, and labour force status, 2009/10
  • hourly participation rates for people working for pay or profit, by weekday and weekend day, 1998/99 and 2009/10.

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See also

Source

Source: Statistics New Zealand, Social Conditions
Frequency: Approximately 10-yearly
Available from: 1998/99
Geographic coverage: National
ISBN: 978-0-478-37709-5

Previous releases 

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