Stats NZ has a new website.

For new releases go to

www.stats.govt.nz

As we transition to our new site, you'll still find some Stats NZ information here on this archive site.

  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+
Subnational Population Estimates: At 30 June 2008
Embargoed until 10:45am  –  23 October 2008
Commentary

National population change

New Zealand's estimated resident population was 4,268,600 at 30 June 2008, an increase of 40,300 (1.0 percent) over the June 2007 figure. The population growth in the June 2008 year was lower than the average annual increase of 45,400 (1.1 percent) recorded during the 10-year period ended 30 June 2008.

The population growth for the June 2008 year resulted from a natural increase (excess of births over deaths) of 35,600 people, and a net international migration gain of 4,700 people. The level of natural increase was the highest for a June year since 1973. In contrast, the level of net international migration was the lowest for a June year since 2001.

North Island and South Island populations

The population of the North Island continued to grow at a slightly faster rate than that of the South Island. An estimated 3,250,700 people lived in the North Island at 30 June 2008, an increase of 31,500 (1.0 percent) from 30 June 2007. The estimated resident population of the South Island grew by 8,900 (0.9 percent) in the June 2008 year to reach 1,017,300. At 30 June 2008, 76 out of every 100 New Zealand residents lived in the North Island.

Regional population change

All of New Zealand's 16 regions recorded population increases during the June 2008 year. Auckland retained its position as New Zealand's fastest-growing region, recording population growth of 1.5 percent. Marlborough (1.2 percent) and Canterbury (1.1 percent) also had growth rates above the national average of 1.0 percent. The largest numerical increases in population were in Auckland (20,800), Canterbury (5,900), Waikato (3,600) and Wellington (3,400).

Graph, Regional Population Change, Year ended 30 June 2008.

---PDF BREAK---

As in the June 2007 year, all 16 regions recorded a natural increase (an excess of births over deaths). However, for 13 regions the level of natural increase was higher in the June 2008 year than in the preceding June year. In numerical terms, the greatest rises in natural increase were in Auckland (up 1,000 from the June 2007 year) and Manawatu-Wanganui (up 300 from the June 2007 year).

In the June 2008 year, seven regions gained population through net migration (international and internal migration combined), while nine regions had a net migration outflow. For the majority of regions, the level of net migration was lower in the June 2008 year than in the preceding June year. However, there was a small increase in the level of net migration for six regions (Gisborne, Taranaki, Manawatu-Wanganui, Nelson, Marlborough and Southland).

At 30 June 2008, Auckland, with an estimated resident population of 1,414,800, was home to about one-third of New Zealand residents. The four northernmost regions (Northland, Auckland, Waikato and Bay of Plenty) contained just over half (53 percent) of New Zealand's population. Canterbury, with an estimated resident population of 552,800, was home to 54 percent of South Island residents.

Population of territorial authorities

In the June 2008 year, 59 of the 73 territorial authorities had population increases, and 19 had growth rates at or above the 1.0 percent national average. The highest rates of population growth were in Queenstown-Lakes District (3.8 percent), Selwyn District (3.2 percent), Waimakariri District (2.2 percent), Manukau City (2.0 percent) and Rodney District (1.9 percent). 

Graph, Fastest-growing Territorial Authories.

There were 14 territorial authorities that had a decrease in population. Of these 14 territorial authorities, 12 were located in the North Island and two were located in the South Island. Rates of population decrease ranged from 0.1 percent (Taupo, Whakatane and Buller districts) to 1.2 percent (Wairoa District).

---PDF BREAK---

During the June 2008 year, the population of Waitakere City grew by 2,900 (1.5 percent) to reach 201,400, exceeding 200,000 for the first time. Waitakere City is now one of five territorial authorities that has a population greater than 200,000. The other territorial authorities are Auckland City (438,100), Christchurch City (368,900), Manukau City (362,000) and North Shore City (223,000).

Two maps are included at the end of this commentary. The maps illustrate population change in New Zealand's territorial authority areas during the June 2008 year.

Urban areas

At 30 June 2008, the estimated resident population of the 16 main urban areas was 3,085,200 (72 percent of New Zealand's population). A further 251,000 people lived in secondary urban areas (5.9 percent of New Zealand's population). The main and secondary urban populations increased by 31,800 (1.0 percent) and 800 (0.3 percent), respectively, during the June 2008 year.

The four largest urban areas – Auckland, Hamilton, Wellington and Christchurch – were home to 53 percent of New Zealand residents at 30 June 2008. The Auckland Urban Area is now home to 40 out of every 100 North Island residents. The Christchurch Urban Area is home to 38 out of every 100 South Island residents.

Graph, Main Urban Area Population Change. Graph, Secondary Urban Area Population Change.

In the June 2008 year, Auckland and Tauranga (1.5 percent each) were the fastest-growing main urban areas, followed by Hamilton (1.3 percent). Twelve main urban areas recorded positive growth rates below the national average of 1.0 percent, and one main urban area (Wanganui) had a population decrease.

Nine of the 14 secondary urban areas recorded positive growth rates in the June 2008 year. The fastest-growing secondary urban area was Pukekohe (2.2 percent). Five secondary urban areas recorded population decreases, ranging from 0.1 percent (Whakatane and Hawera) to 1.1 percent (Tokoroa).

Median centre of population

The median centre of population is a measure that describes the spatial distribution of the population. It is the point of intersection of two lines, one equally dividing the population north and south, the other equally dividing the population east and west.

Map, Media Centre of Population.  

At the time of the 1921 Census, New Zealand's median centre of population lay off the coast of Horowhenua (174o43' East, 40o33' South), approximately 40 kilometres west of Waitarere. At this time, New Zealand's population was 1.27 million and the population of the North Island (791,900) and the South Island (479,800) were more evenly balanced.

Since 1921, New Zealand's median centre of population has moved northward. At 30 June 1998 it was located southeast of Waikawau in the Waitomo District (174o45' East, 38o30' South), approximately 230 kilometres north of its 1921 location. In the 10-year period ended 30 June 2008, the median centre of population moved another 40 kilometres northward, to lie about five kilometres southeast of Taharoa in the Waitomo District (174o45' East, 38o10' South).

The northward movement of the median centre of population is a reflection of different population growth rates across the country. The population of the North Island has grown faster than that of the South Island, and there has been relatively rapid population growth in the Auckland Region. In the 10-year period ended 30 June 2008, the Auckland Region accounted for 54 percent of New Zealand's population growth.

---PDF BREAK---

Final figures

The population estimates for the June 2008 year quoted above and contained in the appended tables are provisional. Processing of final statistics will be completed in November 2008.

For technical information contact:
Alan Ambury or Joel Watkins
Christchurch 03 964 8700
Email: info@stats.govt.nz

Next release ...

Subnational Population Estimates: At 30 June 2009 will be released in October 2009

 Map, Annual Population Change, North Island Territorial Authorities.

Map, Annual Population Change, South Island Territorial Authorities.

  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+
Top
  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+