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Output

Standard output

Weekly rent paid by dollar value

The standard output variable categories are the same as the classification categories. The residual categories may be output separately or combined. Where a combination item of residuals is to be used in output, this item should be labelled ‘not elsewhere included’ and should have a footnote indicating its composition.

The residual categories are defined in Glossary and references.

The full classification is available in Download of classification.

Weekly rent paid in dollar ranges

The standard output categories for weekly rent paid are based on percentiles.

The standard set of categories includes a minimum category for responses below or at the 10th percentile rounded to the nearest $10; a maximum category for responses above the 90th percentile rounded to the nearest $10; and eight range categories, rounded and evenly spaced between the extreme minimum and maximum categories.

If for example, the tenth percentile was $102 and the ninetieth percentile was $496 then the minimum category would be less than or equal to $100 and the maximum category would be greater than $500. The intermediate ranges would be calculated by dividing the difference between the extreme points by eight and including steps of that size. In this example the difference is 400, and when divided by eight indicates that the step size should be fifty. Therefore the output categories for this example are :

Category Descriptor
1 Less than or equal to $100
2 $101 – $150
3 $151 – $200
4 $201 – $250
5 $251 – $300
6 $301 – $350
7 $351 – $400
8 $401 – $450
9 $451 – $500
10 $501 and greater

Different surveys will produce different ranges so the dollar values for the range of rent covered by the categories will be printed in all tables. This method of classification is useful for comparing groups over time. It allows a simple comparison of weekly rent paid over time and across population groups. For example, by using this classification at two different points of time we can study the ten percent of the population in the lowest rental dwellings or the most expensive rental dwellings, etc (although these will not remain identical populations as there will be some movement of people between percentiles).

A drawback with this classification is that the extreme categories contain units with widely varying values (assuming that weekly rental has a normal curve). This may not be the best way of showing the effect on other variables which may be cross-classified with weekly rent paid. Thus, if desired for particular purposes, it is permitted to make sub–divisions within the extreme categories. In some instances it may also be necessary to subdivide a category.

The residual categories may be output separately or combined. Where a combination item of residuals is to be used in output, this item should be labelled ‘not elsewhere included’ and should have a footnote indicating its composition.

The residual categories are defined in Glossary and references.

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