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Using Micro-data for the Assessment of Carbon Emissions in the New Zealand Manufacturing Industry

Authors

Martin Brown-Santirso and Nedra Fu

Abstract

In the years leading to the Kyoto Protocol Commitment Period commencing on 1 January 2008, the New Zealand Government has put forward a number of proposals intended to help the country meet its international obligations. This has led to a number of studies being carried out which attempt to determine the overall effect of implementing these proposals to the economy, including flow on effects on consumption and investment patterns.

Using unit record data from the Manufacturing Energy Use Survey (MEUS) carried out by Statistics New Zealand in 2006, this study adds to this body on knowledge by calculating energy related carbon emissions down to the company level for the March 2006 year.

This study also makes use of the Annual Enterprise Survey (AES) unit record data to directly compare the intermediate consumption values for each enterprise against costs of carbon emissions at several carbon price scenarios ($15, $25, $50 and $100 dollars per tonne). Thus, the study generates an estimate of the added cost of production that arises from energy related carbon emissions for each enterprise.

The results are an estimate of the economic burden that a carbon pricing system will place on the manufacturing industry through direct added costs from energy use. The study does not venture into expanding the estimates to indirect costs, costs to the rest of the economy, make any projections, or speculate about how carbon costs will be absorbed or managed by the manufacturing industry.

pdf icon. Using Micro-data for the Assessment of Carbon Emissions in the New Zealand Manufacturing Industry (PDF, 225KB)

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