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Evaluating the potential of linked data sources for population estimates: The Integrated Data Infrastructure as an example

Evaluating the potential of linked data sources for population estimates: The Integrated Data Infrastructure as an example is part of the first phase of the longer-term strand of the Census Transformation programme.

The paper describes a preliminary investigation into the feasibility of one of the administrative census options: linking multiple existing administrative data sources to produce a statistical population list. Under this option, the statistically constructed list of the New Zealand population would form the basis for estimating population counts without the need for a full census.

The linked administrative data sources available in Statistics NZ’s Integrated Data Infrastructure (IDI) were used as a test environment to develop methods for constructing a statistical population list. Population estimates were then derived and compared with official estimated resident population figures.

While we identified clear limitations in the administrative sources available at the time of the study, the results show enough promise to continue with further investigations. The findings will help guide decisions about where to direct future work.

Read or print the PDF from 'Available files' above. If you have problems viewing the file, see opening files and PDFs.

Citation 
Gibb, S, & Shrosbree, E (2014). Evaluating the potential of linked data sources for population estimates: The Integrated Data Infrastructure as an example. Available from www.stats.govt.nz.

ISBN 978-0-478-42924-4 (online)

Published 2 September 2014

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